MANITOWOC COUNTY PERSONAL SKETCHES

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FRANK VADER sent in by researcher/see contributors page Manitowoc Tribune 24 Dec. 1891 (page 3,) -FRANK VADER and family left Wednesday Morning for Scot City, Kansas. Frank intends to establish a boiler shop at that place. His many friends here wish them good luck and prosperity in their new location.

FRANKLIN VADER sent in by researcher/see contributors page Lake Shore Times 18 September, 1883 (Page 2, column 3) On Wednesday last a number of our friends attended the wedding of Miss Minnie Tufts the eldest daughter of Mr. John Tufts of Manitowoc Rapids a gentleman well known in our vicinity. The bridegroom was Mr. Frank Vader of Menominee, Mich. ----------------------------- Lake Shore Times 18 September, 1883( Page 1, Column 5) Vader-Tufts. THE SOCIAL EVENT OF THE WEEK-A SPECIAL REPORTER OF THE TIMES GIVES FULL PARTICULARS OF THE PLEASANT AFFAIR. The grand social event of the season was the wedding, on Wednesday last, of Mr. Franklin Vader, of Menominee, Mich., and Miss Minnie Tufts, of Manitowoc. The ceremony took place in the Town of Manitowoc Rapids, at the residence of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. John S. Tufts. The nuptial knot was tied by Rev. J. M. Craig , in the impressive manner so characteristic of the reverend gentleman. Over two hundred of the friends of the two families,-Vader and Tufts,- were present and enjoyed the hospitality so cordially tendered. Every room in the house, from cellar to garret, was thrown open to the quests, and in the shady grove between the house and the street, a huge canvas tent had been erected, with a splendid dancing. At one end of this tent was an arched wreath of flowers, with the lucky horseshoe interwoven. Beneath this arch the marriage ceremony was performed and when the congratulations had in a measure subsided, the sweet, silver tones of Jere Collins’ and Van Camp’s violins were heard, -then there was music and dancing. The refreshment rooms were thrown open at eleven o'clock, the tables groaning under the bountiful supply of all dainties of culinary art, with Chris. Koebke in charge of the oyster department, to which all did ample justice. After supper dancing was resumed and continued until a late hour. To those who know John Tufts and his estimable wife, it is unnecessary to say, that all were received and entertained in the most affable manner, and when the guests departed for home, the opinion was unanimous that the affair had been one of those pleasant things that are not soon forgotten. Numerous rich and handsome gifts were bestowed upon the lovely bride, among them being the following; Toilet Set, Mr. and Mrs. McDonald, of Marion, Wis. Syrup Pitcher, Miss Etta Wells. Syrup Pitcher, Miss Delia Niles, Eaton. Tea Castor, Mr. and Mrs. Barnum, Marion, Wis. History of Wisconsin, Bailey Pierce, Rapids. Steel Engraving, John Kessler, Manitowoc. Oil Chromo, Ed. Lindholm, Rapids. Butter Knife and Half - Dozen silver Tea Spoons, Mr. and Mrs. P. S. Pierce, Manitowoc. Fruit Knife, Miss Cora Pierce, Manitowoc. Set of Silver Tea Spoons, Mrs. Albert Robertson, Manitowoc. Chamber Set, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Williams, Rapids. Byron’s Poems, Dr. Seeger, Manitowoc. Silver dinner Castor, Mr. and Mrs. R. D. Smart, Manitowoc. Dressing Glass, Miss Kath Cronan, Vulcan, Michigan. A beautiful Yoke Bouquet, Mrs. J. M. Craig, Manitowoc. Dressing Case, Dr. Frazer, Manitowoc. Clock, Lyman Emerson, Manitowoc. Beautiful Lamp, Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Pierce, Rapids. Silver Bouquet Holder, Mr. and Mrs. W. Binkleman, Marion, Wis. Electric Hair Brush, Miss Jennie Lee, Eaton. A beautiful worked bed quilt, Miss Eliza Tufts. Silver spoon holder, Miss Clara Pierce, Rapids. Pair of embroidered damask towel pillow shams, Mrs. Moses Tufts, Rapids. Majolica bread plate cup and saucer, Mrs. Louis Lawrence. Card Case and Card receiver, Charles Beers, Manitowoc. Statuette, Freddy Tufts. Set of Chromos, Miss Mabel Robertson, Manitowoc. Teapot, Mr. and Mrs. John Symos, Manitowoc. Majolica Pitchers, Misses Ella Tufts, Maggie Mines, Rapids. Bible, Mrs., Margaret Allen, Rapids. Glass Pickle dish, Mrs. P. Pierce, Rapids. Glass cake dish, Miss Kate Nense, Rapids. Silver cake-basket, Mrs. I. B. Smith, Menominee, Mich. Clock, Jere Collins and sister, Manitowoc. Fruit dish and bouquet, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L. Edwards, Manitowoc. Pickle dish and fork, Mr. and Mrs. Len Vader, Rapids. Lounge, Willie Vader and John Tufts, Jr., Rapids. Camp Chair, Dan Allen, Rapids. Camp rocking chair, Robert Seeger, Manitowoc. Majolica set, Ed and Jacob Wells, Silver Cake basket, Mr. and Mrs. D. S. Day, Manitowoc. Fruit-basket, Mr. and Mrs. Gustaveson, Rapids. Pickle Castor, Mr. Mrs. R. Moran, Manitowoc. Card basket, Miss Mary McFarland, Manitowoc. Pickle castor and fork, William Hubbard, Rapids. Chair tidy, Miss Mattie Bacon, Manitowoc. Chair tidy, Miss Maranda Pierce, Rapids. Bed Spread, Miss Anna Rechygl Napkin Rings, Mr. and Mrs. Chris, Koebke, Manitowoc. Table spread, Mrs. Jacob Lee, Rockland. Table spread, Mr. Frank Tolby. Doz. Towels, Frank Larsen. Rapids Table spread, Jacob Ringwood. Table spread, Mr. and Mrs. Ranisdell, Marion, Wis. Lace bedspread and pillow shams, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Haverland, Manitowoc. Brussels Rug, Thos. and Oscar Torrison, Manitowoc. Set of nickel plated flat irons, Mr. and Mrs. M. H. Murphy, Manitowoc. Set of fine cut glass ware, Mr. Anthony McNulty, Cato. Handsome lamp, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Wells, Rapids. Double Pickle dish, Mr. Mrs. John Bibinger, Manitowoc. Bohemian glass ware, Miss Susie Pierce, Rapids. Set of silver tea spoons, Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Rand, Manitowoc. Moustache Cup and saucer, Chris. Koebke, Manitowoc. Silver soup ladle, Miss Hattie Burnett, Manitowoc. Majolica Moustache cup, Mr. Van Camp, Manitowoc. Silver napkin rings, Miss Maggie McCullough, Cederville, Mich. Syrup Pitcher and stand, Ole and Niels Stevenson, Rapids. Set of cut glass ware, Grandpa Ramsdell, Marion, Wis.

GEORGE VADER sent in by researcher/see contributors pg. Manitowoc Tribune 23 March, 1876, (page 3, col. 2) Geo. VADER, while chopping wood near Kings Bridge, last Saturday forenoon, had the misfortune to cut off three toes of the right foot. He was brought to the city as soon as possible, and when the office of a physician was reached, was about ready to expire from loss of blood.

HENRY VADER Manitowoc Pilot sent in by researcher see contributors page 3 February, 1860, ( page 3, column 3.) MARRIED In Cato, January 21, by the Rev. Israel C. Holmes, Mr. HENRY VADER, of this village, to Miss ELIZA JANE TUFTS, daughter of Mr. Moses Tufts, of Manitowoc Rapids.

LEONARD VADER sent in by researcher/see contributors page Lake Shore Times 18 September, 1883( Page 1, Column 5) Lake Shore Times, April 29, 1884 G. A. R. Members of H. M. Walker Post 18, will meet in their Hall on Wednesday (tomorrow) after noon at 3 P. M. sharp to attend the funeral of Comrade Leonard Vader.- By order of the Commander. E. R. Smith, Adjutant. ---------------------------------- Lake Shore Times, 6 May, 1884, (page 3) The funeral of Mr. Len. Vader was well attended. About twenty members of the G. A. R. were present. ------------------- Lake Shore Times, 6 May, 1884 (page 2, column 6) Order to Hear Petition for Administration. (First publication May 6, 1884.) IN PROBATE-MANITOWOC COUNTY COURT. In the matter of the estate of Leonard Vader, deceased. On reading and filing the petition of Jane Vader, of Manitowoc Rapids, Wis., representing among other things that Leonard Vader, late of Manitowoc Rapids on the 27th day of April, A. D. 1884, at Manitowoc Rapids, died intestate leaving goods, chattels and estate within this State, and that the said petitioner is the widow of said deceased, and praying that administration of said estate by to John S. Tufts granted, it is ordered that said petition be heard before this Court , on Tuesday, the 3rd day of June A. D., 1884, at 10 o’clock A. M. at my office in said county. Ordered further that notice thereof be given to the heirs of said deceased, and to all persons interested by publishing a copy of this order for three successive weeks prior to said day of hearing, in the Lake Shore Times, a weekly newspaper published at Manitowoc in said County. Dated at Manitowoc, the 3rd day of May, A. D. 1884. 136-3t R. D. SMART, County Judge, G. G. SEDGWICK, Atty for Petitioner.

N. VADER sent in by researcher/see contributors page 20 July, 1871, (Page 4, column 5) Mr. N. VADER, who has sold out his interest at Clay Banks, is about opening a new store with a large and complete assortment of seasonable goods in the building lately occupied by Mr. Horn on the corner of York and 8th St. Mr. Vader is too well and too favorably known through out the county to require any especial recommendation on our part. He has our best wishes and will have the custom and support of a large number of friends and acquaintances. ----------- Manitowoc Tribune, 27 July, 1871 (Page 4 ) MR. VADER’S new store on the corner of York and 8th streets is filling up rapidly with a splendid lot of new and seasonable goods, and from the piles of full boxes and packages yet untouched, we cannot see how these goods can all be properly displayed. As far as we can now judge, Mr. Vader will have about everything that can be asked for in the way of fancy and domestic dry goods, groceries, provisions, Hats and Caps, boots and shoes, crockery, hardware and farming utensils; and as Mr. Vader promises to sell at the lowest possible prices, for ready pay or any kind of farmers produce, we expect he will do as much business as any merchant in this City. See his advertisement, and then his store. --------- Manitowoc Tribune 27 February, 1873 (page 1, col. 8) Bankrupt Sale DISTRICT Court of the United States, Eastern District of Wisconsin, In the matter of Nicholas Vader, Bankrupt. In Bankruptcy. By virtue of an order made by the District Court of the United States for the Eastern District of Wisconsin on the twelfth day of February, 1873, I (or he), will sell at Public Auction at the U. S. Marshal’s Office, P. O. building, Milwaukee, Wis., the following described property, belonging to the estate of said Vader. to-wit: The east half of the south west quarter of section twenty-one (21), also the south west quarter of the south east quarter of section twenty one (21) all in town 21, range 23, excepting 1 and one-half acres near the S. W. corner of said south west quarter of the south east quarter and covering graves thereon; also the northwest quarter of the north east quarter of section 28, town 21, range 23, containing in all 58 and one-half acres, more or less, situate, lying and being in the County of Manitowoc and State of Wisconsin free and clear from all incumbances, on the 29th day of April 1873, at 11 o’clock, A. M. to the highest bidder for Cash. CHARLES H. HAMILTON, Assignee.

NICK VADER sent in by researcher/see contributors page Manitowoc Tribune, 17 June, 1869, (Page 4, col. 1.) Nick Vader has bought the pier 3 miles north of Ahnapee where he intends to locate for the purpose of shipping ties, lumber, shingles, posts etc. of which great quantities are manufactured. Manitowoc Tribune

GUSTAV VALLESKEY This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.437-438. Gustav Valleskey, one of the German-American farmers of the town of Rockland is living on two hundred and thirty-seven acres of rich land on sections 28, 27 and 34 and 33. He was born in Germany, August 31, 1850, a son of Martin and Catherine Valleskey. They came to America in 1856, and bought forty acres of wild land in Rockland, which farm is included in the present holdings of their son, Gustav. Here they built the first house and commenced the other improvements. The mother died the day after they moved into their house, and the father continued to live there with his children, until his death, January 28, 1887, when he was seventy-nine years old. The mother was buried on the old farm and the father in the Lutheran cemetery at Reedsville. Gustav was the third of the five children born to his parents, and remained with his father until the latter’s death. At that time, the son inherited the homestead as a reward of his faithful service. He has one hundred and fifty acres under the plow, and all his land is fenced with barbed wire. He carries on general farming, raising grain, clover seed and sugar beets, and keeps hogs and cattle, milking twenty-four cows of graded stock, marketing his dairy products. He raises Chester-White hogs, has twenty-four South Down sheep and forty colonies of bees. The basement barn is forty feet by sixty feet, with cement floors and patent stanchions, and was built in 1887. Another barn, forty by seventy-eight feet was built in 1888, and a third one, thirty feet by ninety feet, was built in 1890. The two-story, fifteen-room brick residence was put up in 1888. All of the improvements were put in by him and his father, and are substantial. The water supply is obtained from open wells. In 1874, Mr. Valleskey married Fredricka Matznick, a daughter of Charles and Minnie Matznick, natives of Germany. They came to the United States, and settled in Sheboygan, on a farm, spending three years there. They then went to Calumet county, and bought forty acres of unbroken land, and lived there until 1883. In that year they came to Manitowoc county, settling on a farm of sixty acres, in the town of Rockland, and this continued their home until 1906, when Mr. Valleskey bought it, and tey made their home with him. The mother passed away, October 26, 1907, and is buried in Eaton church cemetery in Rockland township. The father survives, being now eighty-six years old. Mrs. Valleskey was the youngest of two children and was born March 19, 1855. Mr. and Mrs. Valleskey have had eleven children, as follows: Paulina, who died aged six years; Minnie, who died aged fourteen months; Ferdinand, who died aged two years; Martin, living in Collins, Wisconsin, where he is agent for the Soo line at that point, who is married and has one child; Charles, who is married and has three children, and is living on a farm in Rockland; Alvina, who married William Mahnke, is living in Newburg, Wisconsin, and has two children; Adolph, married, who is living in Calumet county on a farm, and Gustav, Selma, Elsie and Elmer living at home. Mr. Valleskey is a republican and served one year as supervisor of his town, and is now road commissioner. He and his family are members of the Lutheran church of Eaton, and for thirteen years he has been church treasurer. A good farmer, an excellent business man and a reliable citizen, Mr Valleskey stands high in the esteem of his associates.

ANGELINE VAN DE LOO (sent in by her grandson, Brian) Miss Angeline Van de Loo, age 84, of 919 Wisconsin Ave. in Sheboygan, passed away Monday afternoon, July 8, 2002, at St. Nicholas Hospital. She was born June 6, 1918, in Cleveland, Wis., a daughter to the late George Sr. and Rose (Junk) Van de Loo. Angeline had worked at Polar Ware Company in Sheboygan for 34 years before retiring in 1980. She loved to play Bingo at various churches in Sheboygan and enjoyed spending time at Oneida. She was a big Packer and Brewer fan. She was a lifetime member of Holy Name of Jesus Catholic Church in Sheboygan. Her most comfortable role in life was being a loving daughter and sister. She lived with and cared for her mother for many years. After her mother's death in June of 1985, she assumed the role of family Matriarch and was a constant companion to her brothers and sisters. She was a very loving sister and shared in both their happiness and times of grief. She was preceded in death by her four brothers, Lester, Anthony, George, Jr., and Francis Vande Loo; and her four sisters, Adelle Kutz, Delores Hauch, Ann Marie Larson and Catherine Fenn. She was also preceded in death by her very special friend, Sam Bodet in 1971. Surviving Angeline are many nieces and nephews and special friends who will all miss her dearly. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated for Angeline on Thursday, July 11, 2002, at 6 p.m. at Holy Name of Jesus Catholic Church in Sheboygan with Reverend Michael Dineen as celebrant. Friends and relatives may call on the family from 4 p.m. until the hour of service on Thursday, at the Church. Burial will be in Calvary Cemetery on Friday, July 12, 2002, at 10 a.m. A memorial fund has been established in the name of Angeline W. Vande Loo. E-mail condolences to zimmerfuneralhome.com. Zimmer Funeral Home of Sheboygan is assisting the family. Tomorrow is Too Late. I had rather have one little rose from the garden of a friend, Than to have the choicest flowers when my stay on earth must end. I had rather have one pleasant word in kindness said to me, Than flattery when my heart is still and life has ceased to be. I had rather have a loving smile from friends I know are true, Than tears shed round my casket when this world I bid adieu. Bring me all the flowers today pink, or white or red, I'd rather have one blossom now than a truckload when I'm dead. Author Unknown (Note: She never married. Her fiance, Sam, died in a boiler-room blast in the 1970's (that is what I heard, but I cannot find the article in my grandmother's papers)

PHILIP AND LOUISA VANDERBLOEMEN (photos sent in by researcher/see contributors page)

Philip Vanderbloemen

Louisa and Philip Vanderbloemen

MILADA C. VAN DER WETTERING Milada C. Van Der Wettering, age 96, of 14795 Whiffen Lane, Mountain, WI, a former Mishicot resident, died Saturday, August 5, 2000 at the Bornemann Nursing Home in Green Bay. Funeral services will be held at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, August 8, 2000 at the Lambert Funeral Home in Mishicot with the Rev. Gerald B. Kempen, O. Praem officiating. Burial will be in Fort Howard Cemetery in Green Bay. Milada was born June 10, 1904, in Manitowoc to the late Joseph and Rosalie (Krajnik) Kaderabek. She married Albert Van Der Wettering August 23, 1924 in Morrison. He preceded her in death on Sept. 30, 1980. She and her husband farmed in the Mishicot area for many years. She enjoyed spending time in the outdoors. Survivors include one daughter with whom she made her home. One grandson and his spouse, one great-grandson. Nieces and nephews also survive. She was preceded in death by her son in law, Lester Heran on June 16, 1995, and by one sister Blance Bustabo, and brother Ervin Kaderabek. Relatives and friends may call from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesday at the Lambert Funeral Home in Mishicot until the time of services at 7 p.m. Herald Time Reporter, August 7, 2000

REV. J.P. VAN TREECK From The History of Northern Wisconsin, Vol II. Chicago: Western Historical Pub. Co., 1881, p. 540 Pastor of St. Wendel Roman Catholic Church, P. O. St. Wendel, born March 9, 1855 in Wilson Township, Sheboygan Co., September, 1877, he commenced a regular course of studies at St. Francis Seminary, Milwaukee; graduated June, 1880; he then returned to Sheboygan County, and was assistant with the Rev. Hamm of St. Nicholas Church. Nov. 6, 1880, came to St. Wendel, where he has been in charge since; he also has charge of two other churches - the St. George's Church of Centerville, and St. Fitel's Church of Meeme.

DANIEL VARNOW Marriage Record Vol. 5, Page 96, # 252 Husband Daniel Varnow Father Ira Varnow Mother Harrell Bellrose Occupation Common Laborer Residence Two Rivers, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin Birthplace Two Rivers, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin Wife Lena Martele Father Mitchell Martele Mother Harriet Cayean Birthplace Two Rivers Date of Marriage October 9, 1882 Place of Marriage Manitowoc, Wisconsin Color of Parties White Type of Ceremony Statute Subscribing Witnesses Joseph Rankin And M. H. Murphy Clergy or Other R.D. Smart, County Judge - Manitowoc

DENYS VARRANEAU Marriage Record Vol. 5, Page 170, # 383. Husband Denys Varraneau Father Arsenius Varraneau Mother Henrietta Bebrose Occupation Day Laborer Residence Two Rivers Birthplace Two Rivers Wife Sibylle Martelle Father Michael Martelle Mother Henrietta Cayean Birthplace Two Rivers Date of Marriage March 28, 1883 Place of Marriage Two Rivers Color of Parties White Type of Ceremony Romain Catholic Subscribing Witnesses Thomas Welbes And Elisabeth Varraneau Clergy or Other M. Welbes - Priest - Two Rivers

LEO VAUDREUIL This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.611-612. Leo Vaudreuil, a well known and substantial business man of Two Rivers, Wisconsin, who for a long period has been engaged in shipping fresh fish and evergreens, was born April 19, 1848, in Canada, and is a son of Frank and Percilla (Caushaum) Vaudreuil. The parents of Mr. Vaudreuil were married in Canada, where the father followed farming and shoemaking, and in 1856 he brought his family, consisting of his wife and seven children, Delia, Leo, Frank, Adeline, Louise, Edmund and Gotfried, to Two Rivers, and settled on what was known then as the “French side,” where he opened a shoemaking shop. He followed his trade for ten years, and then engaged in seine fishing, which he followed until his death, May 20, 1907, when he was ninety-two years of age, his wife having passed away in 1892, when she was sixty-six years old, and both were members of the Catholic church. Leo Vaudreuil was reared to manhood in Two Rivers, and was here married in 1870 to Miss Clementine LeClair, a daughter of Charles LeClair, who moved to New York from Canada, and settled on a farm in Manitowoc county during the early '50’s. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Vaudreuil, namely: Ed, Olive, Frank, Elizabeth and John. Mr. Vaudreuil followed the occupation of his father, and he has been very successful in his business efforts and now has a fine home and a plentiful, competence. His wife has been a true helpmeet to him during his years of business life, and for thirty years conducted a millinery in Two Rivers. He has carried on his business on an extensive scale, shipping to Chicago and other points, and has made a catch of seven thousand six hundred and twenty pounds of fish at one time, this being his record catch. Mr. Vaudreuil has been interested in political matters for a number of years, and has served as a member of the city council.

PETER VETTER This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.465-466. Peter Vetter, whose tireless energy and close application have brought him highly deserved success, was born on the farm he now owns and operates on June 28, 1852. His father, Jacob Vetter, was born and reared in Alsace-Lorraine, whence he emigrated to the United States in 1848. When he first came to this country he located in Ohio, where he worked out by the month for a year, but at the expiration of that time he came to Manitowoc county and invested the hard-earned savings from his meager wages in the land that his son Peter now owns. Pioneer conditions yet prevailed in this section and the country was but sparsely settled, Mr. Vetter's nearest neighbor being located three miles distant, while the greater portion of the land was still covered with a dense growth of timber. The winters were long and severe, but Mr. Vetter was a man of much determination of purpose, and although the future did not appear very promising and he had but little means to provide him with tools and the necessities of life, he courageously undertook the clearing of his place. He erected a crude log cabin, and there he lived alone for two years, devoting his entire time to clearing and placing his land under cultivation. Later his prospects looked brighter and feeling hopeful of his future success, in 1851, he was united in marriage to Miss Minnie K. Neitzel, who emigrated to America with her father, Michael Neitzel in 1850. Immediately thereafter he brought his bride to his farm and here they passed the entire period of their domestic life, the mother passing away in 1886 at the age of fifty-six years. The father, however, had attained the venerable age of eighty at the time of his death in 1894. Ten children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Vetter, of whom the eldest is our subject. The entire life of Peter Vetter has been passed amid the scenes with which he is now familiar, as he has always made his home on the farm where he is now living. When old enough to begin his education he entered the district school in the vicinity and while there engaged in the mastery of the common branches; he also assisted his father with the work of the fields and care of the stock. Subsequently he continued his studies in the parochial school, but as is usual in the rural districts, he early laid aside his text-books and gave his undivided attention to the work of the farm, and has ever since devoted his energies to agricultural pursuits. In 1887, the year following the death of the mother, he bought the old home place from his father. During the long period of his ownership he has wrought many and extensive improvements, consistent with the spirit of progress that has always characterized his undertakings. Many of the buildings now standing, including the residence, were erected by his father, but he has remodeled and improved some of these and built others while he has installed many modern conveniences and comforts, and now owns one of the best equipped farms in the community. Mr. Vetter is a very practical man and progressive in his ideas and a few years ago he tilled all of his fields, and as he makes a careful study of his soil, planting it to such cereals as are best adapted to it, he annually reaps abundant harvests. His land is now under high cultivation, substantially fenced and well improved, everything about the place evidencing capable management and intelligent supervision. In 1890, Mr. Vetter was married to Miss Augusta Post, who emigrated to this country from Germany with her mother, and they have become the parents of twelve children, two of whom, Roland and Herbert are now deceased. Those living are as follows: Arthur, Emil, Powell, Meinhold, Rosa, Ella, Hedwig, Hilda, Juliana and Melvin. The parents both hold membership in the German Evangelical Lutheran church of Liberty township in the faith of which they are rearing their family. Mr. Vetter has never been an aspirant to office, but he takes an interest in all local affairs as he is a public—spirited man and is always ready to lend his assistance in promoting the welfare of the community.

EMIL VETTING This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.10-11. Emil Vetting, chairman of the town board of Manitowoc Rapids, and one of his community’s leading agriculturists, is a native of the city of Manitowoc, and was born February 16, 1864, a son of Louis and Julia (Reich) Vetting. Louis Vetting was born in 1830, in Germany, and came to the United States at the age of eighteen years with his brother, Frederick, securing employment by the month as a farm hand in Manitowoc county, and also engaging in the manufacture of shingles. Until 1868 he made his home in the city of Manitowoc, and in that year purchased the land that became the Vetting family homestead, on which there had been but little improving done, the family residence being a log barn until Mr. Vetting could erect a more comfortable home. The remainder of Mr. Vetting’s life was spent on this land and at the time of his death he had developed it into a valuable property, being ranked among the leading farmers of his community. He died in 1895, while his widow, who was born August 4, 1839, in Germany, survived him until 1911 and passed away in the city of Manitowoc. Louis Vetting served his town as assessor for two terms and always took a deep and active interest in the official affairs of his community. Emil Vetting was one of a family of eight children, and was four years of age when the family moved to the town of Rapids, his education being secured in the district schools here. Reared to the occupation of a farmer, he has made this his life work, and his knowledge of matters agricultural have made him one of Rapids’ most successful men in that line. Like his father, Mr. Vetting has interested himself in matters pertaining to the public welfare of this section, and he has served as supervisor of the town of Rapids for two years, and in 1909 was elected by his fellow townsmen to act in the capacity of chairman of the board, a position which he at present very acceptably fills. Mr. Vetting bought his farm in 1895, and during the same year was united in marriage with Miss Matilda Larson, daughter of Ole and Maria Larson, natives of Norway, who came to this country and settled in the town of Cato, Manitowoc county, where Mrs. Vetting was born. Seven children have been born to this union: Eugene, Olga, Irvin, Herbert, Clarence, Helen and Viola. The family is connected with the German Lutheran church.

ALBERT JOHN VITS This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.20-21. Albert J. Vits who is one of the members of the prominent manufacturing concern of the Aluminum Goods Manufacturing Company, of Manitowoc, Wisconsin, is a native of this city, and was born in 1870, a son of Henry Vits, the founder of this large business. William H. Vits, the grandfather of Albert J., brought his four children with him to the United States in 1855: Annie, who married Christian Weyer, and moved to Kansas, where both died; Mary, who married Jacob Bierhaus, a butcher of Manitowoc, and died in 1864; Henry, the father of our subject, and Minnie, deceased, who was the wife of John Norton, of Kansas. His wife, Henrietta (Laufs) Vits, had died in Germany before the removal of the family to this country. In 1854 he had come here on an investigating trip and bought land in Meeme township, Manitowoc county, on which he erected one of the first gristmills in the county, which he later sold. In 1858 he went to Kansas, and remained with a married daughter until 1870, and then returned to the old home farm, where he spent three years. When his son, Henry, came to Manitowoc to engage in business, the aged father accompanied him, and lived in his home until a few months prior to his death, when he returned to Kansas, and there passed away. Henry Vits was thirteen years of age when he came to the United States, and about 186o served three years as an apprentice in the tanning business. In 1868 he moved on a farm in Newton township where he remained until January, 1873, when he engaged in the tanning business in Manitowoc with Martin Vollendorf. The partnership was dissolved in 1876, when Mr. Vits was associated with Louis Sherman for four years, and then bought the plant owned by Mr. Vollendorf, his former partner, and operated it until 1898. In that year he founded on a small scale the company which formed the nucleus of the present large husiness. Mr. Vits has been very prominent in public affairs, having been postmaster of Manitowoc from 1894 until 1898, and a member of the hoard of supervisors and the council, and having the honor of representing his district in the state assembly. He is now a member of the jury commission of the school board and of the park commission, and is prominent fraternally as an Odd Fellow. His marriage occurred April 28, 1866, when he was united with Mary Hockemeyer, daughter of Fred Hockemeyer, an early settler of Manitowoc. Mr. and Mrs. Vits became the parents of nine children, five of whom survive, namely: Albert, George and Hugo, all associated with the business founded by their father; Hattie, who married John Topic and resides in Detroit, Michigan; and Emma, who married William F. Pflueger of Manitowoc. The Aluminum Goods Manufacturing Company was organized January 1, 1908, combining the Aluminum Manufacturing Company of Two Rivers, founded about 1895, by Joseph Koenig and the Hamilton brothers; the New Jersey Aluminum Company of Newark, New Jersey, founded in 1890; and the Manitowoc Aluminum Novelty Company, founded in 1898 by Henry Vits. The present immense plant has just been completed, and is of fireproof construction and equipped with automatic sprinklers. It is thoroughly modern in every respect, and is one of the best of its kind in the entire state, and six hundred people are employed, the product embracing a general line of novelties and cooking utensils, although the latter are manufactured as a side line. The goods are recognized as the best on the market and are sold all over the United States and in foreign countries. This concern is absolutely independent of all other companies. Albert J. Vits was given a public-school education, and then entered the Milwaukee Dental College, from which he was graduated in 1900, but after eleven years of practice in Manitowoc, decided to enter the business field, and associated himself with the company with which he is now connected. He was married July 15, 1903, to Miss Anna Zeman, of Manitowoc, daughter of Frank Zeman, an early settler of this county, and two children, a son and a daughter, have been born to this union. Mr. Vits is a popular member of the Elks. (Note: co. mar. index has July 15, 1902 as date of marriage)

GEORGE VITS This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.15-16. George Vits, president of the Aluminum Goods Manufacturing Company, of Manitowoc, Wisconsin, and one of this city’s enterprising and progressive business men and public-spirited citizens, is a son of Henry Vits, who founded the company and was its leading spirit from the time that it was only a small, and still doubtful venture until it had reached proportions that placed it among the leading industries of Manitowoc. The Aluminum Goods Manufacturing Company was organized January 1, 1908, combining three large manufacturing concerns, namely: The Aluminum Manufacturing Company of Two Rivers, Wisconsin; the Aluminum Manufacturing Company, of Newark, New Jersey; and the Manitowoc Aluminum Novelty Company, of this city. In 1911, following out the idea to combine all three under one roof, a factory building was erected in Manitowoc, three stories in height, three hundred by forty feet, with an adjoining power plant, one hundred and fifty by fifty feet. The service tower is thirty by fifty feet, and the entire plant is operated by electricity. The buildings are of brick, with lower floors cemented, the cross beams and pillars are of iron, the second and third floors of mill construction, and all the structures are absolutely fireproof, the automatic sprinkler system being installed throughout. A force of six hundred employes is necessary to handle the business, the product being a general line of novelties and cooking utensils, although the latter are manufactured only as a side line. The company bears the reputation of manufacturing the best goods obtainable, and sells its product all over the United States and in foreign countries, being absolutely independent of any other concern. The Manitowoc Aluminum Novelty Company was organized in 1898, with Henry Vits as president; William F. Pflueger, secretary; and William Vits, vice president and superintendent. The concern was started in a small way, and grew until it employed one hundred and thirty people. The Two Rivers Manufacturing Company was organized about 1895 by Joseph Koenig. and the Hamilton brothers, and at the time of the reorganization was employing one hundred and fifty people. The New Jersey Aluminum Company has been in operation since 1890. and brought a force of over one hundred people to the new organization. The present officers of the company are: George Vits, president and general manager; F. Magee, secretary and treasurer, and Joseph Koenig, vice president. Henry Vits was born in Rheydt, Rhine Province. Prussia, Germany, January 21, 1842, being a son of William H. and Henrietta (Laufs) Vits, the latter of whom died in the fatherland. William H. Vits brought his family in 1855, after a trip here in 1854, when he bought land in Meeme township, Manitowoc county. On this he built one of the first grist mills in the county but later sold it. In 1858 he went to Kansas, to visit a married daughter, but in 1870 returned to this county, and for three years lived on the old home farm. In 1873 Henry Vits moved to the city of Manitowoc, going into business, and his father resided with him there until a few months prior to his death, when he again went to Kansas, where his death occurred. William H. Vits brought four children to the United States: Annie, who married Christian Weyer and moved to Kansas, where both died; Mary, who married Jacob Bierhaus, a butcher of Manitowoc, and died in 1864; Henry; and Minnie, who married John Norton of Kansas and died there. Henry Vits was thirteen years of age when he came to the United States and until January, 1873, worked on the old home farm in Meeme township. He then came to Manitowoc, and in conjunction with Martin Vollendorf carried on a tanning business until 1876, when the partnership was dissolved. He was then associated with Louis Sherman in the same line for four years, after which he bought the tanning plant of Mr. Vollendorf, and until 1898 continued in that business alone. In that same year he began manufacturing aluminum products, founding the business which formed the nucleus of the present large company. From 1894 until 1898, Mr. Vits served as postmaster of Manitowoc, and he also represented his district in the state assembly and served on the board of supervisors and on the city council. He is now a member of the jury commission of the school board and of the park commission and is a prominent member of the Odd Fellows. On April 28, 1866, he married Mary Hockemeyer, daughter of Fred Hockemeyer, one of Manitowoc’s early settlers, and to this union there were born nine children, of whom five survive, namely: Albert, George and Hugo, all connected with the business founded by their father; Hattie, who married John Topic, and resides in Detroit, Michigan; and Emma, the wife of William F. Pflueger, of Manitowoc, Wisconsin.

HENRY VITS This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.54-57. The city of Manitowoc, Wisconsin, has many important business industries, employing a large number of people in the manufacture of products which are shipped all over the world, but none is better known perhaps than the Aluminum Goods Manufacturing Company, the founder of which, Henry Vits, is one of the city’s sterling citizens and successful business men. This company, organized January 1, 1908, combined three large manufacturing companies, namely: the Aluminum Manufacturing Company of Two Rivers, Wisconsin; the New Jersey Aluminum Company of Newark, New Jersey; and the Manitowoc Aluminum Novelty Company of this city. In 1911 the idea was formed to combine all three under one roof and a large factory building three hundred by forty feet, three stories in height, with a power plant one hundred and fifty by fifty feet adjoining was erected in Manitowoc. The service tower is thirty by fifty feet and the entire plant is operated by electricity. The buildings are of brick, the lower floors being cement, the cross beams and pillars of iron, the second and third floors of mill construction and all the structures are absolutely fireproof, the automatic sprinkler system being installed throughout. A force of six hundred employes are necessary to handle the business, the product being a general line of novelties and cooking utensils, the latter being manufactured as a side line only. The company bears the reputation of manufacturing the best goods obtainable and sells its product all over the United States and in foreign countries, and is absolutely independent of any other concern. The Manitowoc Aluminum Novelty Company was organized in 1898, when Henry Vits became president; William F. Pflueger, secretary; and William Vits, vice president and superintendent, and started in a small way, growing until it employed one hundred and thirty hands. The Two Rivers Aluminum Manufacturing Company was organized about 1895, by Joseph Koenig and the Hamilton brothers, and at the time of the reorganization was employing one hundred and fifty people. The New Jersey Aluminum Company has been in operation since 1890 and brought a force of one hundred and fifty people to the new organization. The present officers of the company are: George Vits, president and general manager; F. Magee, secretary and treasurer; and Joseph Koenig, vice president and general superintendent of the three factories. Henry Vits was born in Rheydt, Rhine Province, Prussia, Germany, January 21, 1842, and is a son of William H. and Henrietta (Laufs) Vits, the latter of whom died in the fatherland. William H. Vits brought his family to the United States in 1855, having been here in 1854 on a visit tentative to definitely locating, buying land in Meeme township, Manitowoc county, where he built one of the first gristmills in the county, which he later sold. In 1858 he went to Kansas, where one of his daughters resided with her husband, but in 1870 returned to this county and for three years resided on the old home farm. In 1873 Henry Vits moved to the city of Manitowoc, and went into business, and his father resided with him until a few months prior to his death, when he again went to Kansas and there died. William H. Vits brought four children to the United States: Annie, who married Christian Weyer and moved to Kansas, where both died; Mary, who died in 1864, the wife of Jacob Bierhaus, engaged in the butchering business in Manitowoc; Henry; and Minnie, deceased, who was the wife of John Norton, a resident of Kansas. Henry Vits was thirteen years of age when he came to the United States, and about 1860 served an apprenticeship of three years in the tanning business. In 1868 he moved on a farm in Newton township until 1873, when he came to Manitowoc and entered business with Martin Vollendorf, and carried on a tanning business until 1876, when they dissolved partnership. He was then associated in the same line with Louis Sherman for four years, after which he bought the tanning plant of Mr. Vollendorf and until 1898 was engaged in business on his own account, in that year entering the aluminum manufacturing business which formed the nucleus for the present large concern. On April 28, 1866, he married Mary Hockemeyer, daughter of Fred Hockemeyer, one of Manitowoc’s early settlers, and to this union there were born nine children, of whom five now survive, namely: Albert, George and Hugo, all connected with the business founded by their father; Hattie, who married John Topic and resides in Detroit, Michigan; and Emma, who married William F. Pflueger, of Manitowoc, Wisconsin. From 1894 until 1898 Mr. Vits served as postmaster of Manitowoc and he also served in the state legislature and as a member of the board of supervisors and the city council. He is now a member of the jury commission of the school board and the park commission and is a prominent member of the Odd Fellows. *********** From The History of Northern Wisconsin, Vol II. Chicago: Western Historical Pub. Co., 1881, p. 534 Tannery, Manitowoc, born Jan. 21, 1842, in Prussia. The family immigrated to America in 1856, located in Manitowoc County. In 1869, he commenced to learn the tannery trade, and in 1873, he, with Mr. Vollendorf, formed a partnership in this business; he was also a partner with Mr. Sherman three years. September, 1879, he bought out Mr. Vollendorf's interest, and has since been alone in this business. Mr. Vits was Alderman, Chairman of the Board, Clerk of the School Board, etc. He was married in 1868, to Mary Hockemeyer, of Hanover; they have seven children, four sons and three daughters.

Henry Vits

HUGO L. VITS This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.18-19. Hugo L. Vits, who is associated with his father and brothers in conducting the affairs of the Aluminum Goods Manufacturing Company, one of Manitowoc’s leading independent industries, is a progressive and enterprising business man and was born in Manitowoc county, December 11, 1880, a son of Henry Vits. His grandfather, William H. Vits, came first to the United States in 1854, and during the next year brought his children to the United States, his wife, Henrietta (Laufs) Vits, having died in Germany. He purchased land in Meeme township, on which he built one of the first grist mills in Manitowoc county, but this he sold in 1858, and went to Kansas, where he lived with his married daughter in 1870, when he returned to the homestead. He resided there until 1873, when he came to Manitowoc with his son, Henry, who went into business here, and he resided with his son until a few months prior to his death, when he again went to Kansas. The four children whom he brought to the United States were: Annie, who married Christian Weyer and died in Kansas; Mary, the wife of Jacob Bierhaus, a butcher of Manitowoc, who died in 1864; Henry; and Minnie, deceased, who was the wife of John Norton, of Kansas. Henry Vits came to the United States when thirteen years of age, was apprenticed to the tanning business for some time and until January, 1873, was engaged in agricultural pursuits in Newton township. He then engaged in the tanning business with Martin Vollendorf and later with Louis Sherman, finally conducting business on his own account until entering the aluminum manufacturing line in 1898. From 1894 until 1898, Mr. Vits served as postmaster of Manitowoc and has been on the board of supervisors and in the city council. He represented his district in the state assembly most acceptably, and is now a member of the jury commission on the school board and of the park commission, and is prominent in fraternal circles as an Odd Fellow. On April 28, 1866, he was united in marriage with Mary Hockemeyer, daughter of Fred Hockemeyer, an early settler of Manitowoc. Mr. and Mrs. Vits have had nine children, those surviving being: Albert, George and Hugo, all connected with the business founded by their father; Hattie, who married John Topic, of Detroit, Michigan and Emma, the wife of William F. Pflueger, of Manitowoc. The Aluminum Goods Manufacturing Company, organized January 1, 1908, combines the Aluminum Manufacturing Company of Two Rivers, Wisconsin, organized about 1895; the New Jersey Aluminum Company of Newark, New Jersey, organized in 1890; and the Manitowoc Aluminum Novelty Company, organized in 1898. In 1911, the present modern fireproof plant was constructed and it is one of the best of its kind in the state, being equipped with automatic sprinklers, operated by electricity, and supplied with the latest devices and improved machinery. Six hundred employes are required to turn out the products which consist of a general line of novelties and cooking utensils although the latter are manufactured only as a side line. These goods are second to none on the market and meet with a ready sale all over this and foreign countries. The company is absolutely independent of any other concern. Mr. Vits is a graduate of the Manitowoc high school, with the class of 1897, and in October of that year he became messenger for the National Bank. Three years later he became bookkeeper for the German American Bank, but after three years left that institution to enlist his services in behalf of the Aluminum Goods Manufacturing Company, with which he is now connected. He is a prominent Mason, belonging to the blue lodge, chapter, commandery and shrine, and also holds membership in the Elks.

Lehrer means instructor
Photo from Zur Erinnerung An Das Funfzigjahrige Jubilaum (First German Evangelical)Manitowoc, Wisconsin 1855-1905 Jubilee date was 7 Februar 1905, book is in the Manitowoc Library.

GEORGE VOGEL From the Manitowoc Pilot, 29 April 1875: In Probate, Manitowoc County Court. In the matter of the estate of George Vogel deceased. To all whom it may concern: Letters of Administration on said estate of George Vogel deceased, having been issued to John Duval on the 30th day of June A.D. 187?, and four months from and other publications of this notice being allowed and limited for creditors to present their claims for examination and allowance. Notice is hereby given that the under- signed will on the third Mondays of May, June, July and August A.D. 1875, at the Probate office in the city of Manitowoc in said county, receive, examine and adjust all claims, and demands of all persons against said deceased. T.G. Olmsted, County Judge

HERMAN W. VOGEL This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.343-344. Herman W. Vogel, who is a member of the firm of Vogel, Stoltenberg & Vogel, of Cleveland, is a native of Manitowoc county, his birth having occurred in Centerville township on the 29th of October, 1873. His parents are Richard and Pauline (Lutze) Vogel, also natives of Manitowoc county, although of German extraction, the grand parents having emigrated to this country from the fatherland. Richard Vogel is a carpenter by trade, but for many years he engaged in agricultural pursuits and is now living retired on his farm, which is being operated by his sons. He and his wife are members of the German Lutheran church of Centerville, in which faith they reared their family. The entire life of Herman W. Vogel has been passed in this county, to whose common schools he is indebted for his education. After laying aside his textbooks, at the age of eighteen years, he began learning the carpenter's trade, continuing to be identified with this occupation until 1911. In November of that year he turned his attention to commercial activities and embarked in the lumber, coal and wood business as a member of the firm he is now connected with. Although he has only been engaged in this for a brief period he has every reason to feel highly gratified with the progress they are making, and to feel assured of their continued prosperity. In this county, in November, 1900, Mr. Vogel was united in marriage to Miss Bertha Kolb, a daughter of Charles Kolb, who for many years engaged in farming in Meeme township, but is now deceased. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Vogel, as follows, Hubert, Laverel, Tackla and Walter. Mr. and Mrs. Vogel are active members of the German Lutheran church and have gained the regard of many of its congregation by reason of their high qualities and personal worth.

HENRY VOGELSANG From The History of Northern Wisconsin, Vol II. Chicago: Western Historical Pub. Co., 1881, p. 536 Farmer, Sec. 33, Manitowoc Rapids Township, owns 120 acres, 100 acres improved. He was born in Hanover, Germany, Feb. 2, 1835. He emigrated to America in 1853, and settled on his farm, where he has since lived. He was married Oct. 28, 1857, on his farm, to Miss Caroline Sieker; she was born in Holland, Oct. 4, 1842. They have nine children living - Mary L., Ida R., J. Frederick, Henry C., Minnie L., William H., Louis G., Eliza J. and Ernest E.

HENRY VOGL This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.279-280. Henry Vogl, farmer and stock-raiser of Two Rivers, Wisconsin, owning a well cultivated property on section 6, is a native of Bohemia, and was born March 4, 1858, a son of Adelbert and Teresa (Hartman) Vogl. In 1868 Adelbert Vogl came to the United States with his wife, and the following named children: Julia, Francis, Henry, Victor, Cornelia, Leo and Rosa, of whom the latter is now deceased, After landing at New York, the family started for Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, and after a short stay at Saxonburg, they located on the present farm of Henry Vogl, a tract of one hundred and sixty acres, of which twenty-five acres were covered with stumps, and upon which a log building had been erected. Adelbert Vogl secured an ox team and started to clear his property, but two and one-half months after coming here his death occurred, when he was only forty-seven years old, and the work of clearing and developing the farm fell to the lot of his widow and children. Henry Vogl received his education in the district school of the town of Two Rivers, and remained on the home farm, doing his share of the hard labor, until he was twenty-two years of age, when he went to Milwaukee. After a year he returned to the homestead to take charge of its operation, his brothers having given up farming to engage in the manufacture of cheese. He made numerous improvements, erected good barns, substantial outbuildings and a comfortable residence, and brought the land under a high state of cultivation, and here he has made his home ever since, being now rated among the substantial farmers of his locality. He has been a hard worker all of his life and his progress has been steady, although he has suffered several painful accidents. When he was a lad of twelve years, while peeling logs, his axe slipped and cut off his great toe, which, however, was secured in place and grew on as well as ever. At about the same time he broke his leg, and later, while driving, the ox team became entangled in a rail fence and his jaw was broken by a flying fence rail. His mother died on the home farm at the age of seventy-eight years. At the age of twenty-four, Mr. Vogl was married to Miss Mary Neiner, a daughter of Peter Neiner, and eleven children have been born to them: Pauline, Julia, Adelheid, Anna, Victor, Mary, Elmer, Charlotte, Thresa, Evelyn and Henry, of whom Anna and Henry are deceased. Mr. Vogel is a democrat in politics, and he has served on the jury and as town constable. The family has always been connected with the Catholic church.

ANTON VOGT From The History of Northern Wisconsin, Vol II. Chicago: Western Historical Pub. Co., 1881, p. 534 Furniture and undertaking, Manitowoc. Was born Nov. 24, 1833. in Prussia. In 1855, he went to Chicago, thence to Two Rivers, and was employed by the Two Rivers Manufacturing Company for eight years. He also worked four years in a ship yard. April 14, 1867, he removed to Manitowoc, and has since engaged in his present business. Married, Oct. 10, 1855, Miss Katherine Althen, of Prussia. She died feb. 3, 1875, aged forty-three years. They have two sons and two daughters. He married for the second time on June 14, 1876, Emily Mueller, a native of Manitowoc County.

ADOLPH VOLLENDORF (From the Manitowoc Herald, Wednesday, June 11, 1902:) Signs with Cupid, Well Known Ball Player Takes Life Contract Today Love stipulated the terms of a life contract into which Adolph Vollendorf, the well known ball player today entered when his marriage to Miss Josephine Peterik was consummated. The ceremony, at which Rev. S.R.S. Gray officiated, was solemnized at the Peterik home on Buffalo street at 8 o'clock in the presence of 100 relatives and friends. The bride, a young lady of rare personal charms, was attired in a gown of white, trimmed in lace and carried bride's roses. Miss Bessie Peterik and George Vollendorf attended the couple. The groome, who is a native of this city, enjoys a national reputation as a ball player and for several years was connected with the associations in New York and Chicago. He recently returned here to make his permanent home. Miss Peterik is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Peterik and is a favorite with all her friends. That Mr. and Mrs. Vollendorf may reach the home plate of happiness is the wish of countless friends to which the Herald adds a hearty second. They will reside on Fourteenth street.

ALFRED W. VOLAND This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.379-380. Alfred W. Voland is engaged in general farming in Schleswig township, cultivating a good tract of land which returns him gratifying crops and that bring him a substantial annual income. He is one of Wisconsin’s native sons, his birth having occurred in Ozaukee county, November 30, 1868. His father, Frederick Voland, was born in Saxony, Germany, in 1845, and when but nine years of age came to America with his parents, Gotlieb and Wilhelmina (Vogtlander) Voland, who settled in Wisconsin. Gotlieb Voland purchased ten acres of land and in addition to the cultivation of that tract he also worked at the mason’s trade. Frederick Voland was largely reared in this state and in 1882 he came to Manitowoc county, where he purchased a farm of fifty-two acres. There he engaged in tilling the soil until his life’s labors were ended in death, March 17, 1908. He had survived his wife who passed away in 1906, at the age of fifty-nine years. She bore the maiden name of Dorothy Struppardt and was a daughter of Andrew Struppardt. Alfred W. Voland was one of a family of eight children and after acquiring his education in the district schools he engaged in farming on the old homestead until the 1st of April, 1912, when he purchased his present place called Brookland Corner near Kiel on the Millhouse road and is therefore identified with general agricultural pursuits in Schleswig township. He allows no obstacles to brook his path if they can be overcome by earnest, determined effort and energy and laudable ambition constitute the prime features in his life and are bringing him desirable success. In 1891 Mr. Voland was united in marriage to Miss Mary Pickruhn, who was born in Manitowoc county and is a daughter of Carl and Anna (Nodler) Pickruhn, both of whom are now deceased. They were early settlers of this county and the father secured a tract of land from the government which he cleared and developed, converting a forest region into productive fields. Upon that place he continued to reside throughout his remaining days. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Voland have been born four children: Anida, who at the age of eighteen years is a high-school student in Kiel; Hilma and Elsie, aged sixteen and fourteen respectively, both in school; and Elmer, a little lad of seven summers. Mr. Voland was reared in the Lutheran faith. He does not take an active part in politics, as his energies are fully occupied with his business affairs, which he pursues with industry and diligence in the attainment of success.

WALLACE H. VOSBURGH, M. D. This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.487-488. Thorough training in the University of Wisconsin and in the University of Illinois has qualified Dr. Wallace H. Vosburgh for the onerous and responsible duties which devolve upon the practitioner of medicine. He has made his home at Cooperstown since 1896 and in the intervening period of sixteen years has gained an extensive practice throughout this section of the county, public opinion placing him among the leading physicians. He was born in Madison, Wisconsin, August 21, 1869. His father, George W. Vosburgh, a native of Holland, became a resident of the capital city in 1856. He was then a young man ambitious to win for himself a creditable and substantial position in business circles in the new world. Throughout his life he carried on farming and also engaged in the stock and grain business, and his capably managed interests brought to him a substantial return. He wedded Miss Mary Leach, who was born in the state of New York and was a daughter of Robert and Emma (Reeve) Leach. The death of George W. Vosburgh occurred in 1891, when he was fifty-seven years of age, and his wife, surviving until 1896, passed away at the age of forty-six years. In their family were six children, of whom two are deceased, one passing away at the age of twenty and the other when seventeen years of age. The four who still survive are: Wallace H.; Gersha, the wife of George Haney, of Butte, Montana; Blanche, the wife of Dr. E. R. Herring, of Shell Lake, Wisconsin; and Roscoe, who is still living at Shell Lake. The experiences of farm life early fell to the lot of Dr. Vosburgh but a desire to enter some other line of business led him to leave the farm and take up the profession of school-teaching after he had completed the work of the public schools. He engaged in teaching for three years, two years of which time were spent in Spencer, Iowa. He carefully saved his salary during that period and was thus enabled to attend the State University of Wisconsin for two years. Later he became a student in the medical department of the University of Illinois, from which he was graduated with the class of 1896. He put his theoretical knowledge to practical test in hospital work in Cook county, Illinois, gaining the broad and valuable experience of hospital practice. On the 21st of April, 1896, he arrived at Cooperstown, where he has since remained, and his advancement has been continuous. He early gave proof of his ability and success in coping with the intricate and complex problems which continually confront the physician and he now has a very large practice extending all over this section, in fact he is one of the prominent and distinguished physicians of the northern part of the county. In 1900 Dr. Vosburgh was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth A. Schmitt, a daughter of Michael and Dorothy (Haws) Schmitt. She died January 11, 1902, at the age of twenty-six years, and Dr. Vosburgh has since wedded Mina M. Monk, who was born in Augusta, Wisconsin, January 18, 1878, a daughter of George Merrill and Leila (Pratt) Merrill, and the legally adopted child of W. A. Monk. Dr. Vosburgh holds membership with the Modern Woodmen of America, with the Rangers, Elks and with the Masonic lodge of Manitowoc. His time and attention, however, are chiefly given to his professional duties. He keeps in touch with the advanced work of the medical fraternity through his membership in the Brown County Medical Society, the Wisconsin State Medical Society, and the American Medical Association. Anything which tends to bring to him the key to the complex mystery which we call life is of interest to him and his reading and research along medical lines has been broad and comprehensive, bringing him into close touch with advanced scientific methods. (note: per family researcher, Elizabeth Schmidt is Schmitt and her parents are Michael and Dorothy Haws Schmitt. I have changed these to reflect the corrections/Shari Milks)

AUGUST C. VOSHARDT This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.229-230. August C. Voshardt, who was long well known as a representative of journalistic interests in this state, was born February 14, 1859, and died February 6, 1901, lacking but a few day’s of being forty-two years of age. His birthplace was near Minden, Germany, and his parents were Henry and Louisa (Buschman) Voshardt, who came to America in 1861, arriving in New York on the 1st of May. They did not tarry in that state, however, but came direct to Wisconsin, settling in Two Rivers, where the father made his home throughout his remaining days. He will always be remembered as an active and worthy citizen, commanding the respect of all by reason of a well spent life. The educational advantages which August C. Voshardt enjoyed were those afforded by the schools of Two Rivers. He attended, however, for only a few years, yet in the school of experience he learned many valuable lessons and his work in a printing office continually broadened his knowledge. He started out to make his own way in the world at the age of thirteen years, going to Kewaunee, Wisconsin, where he began learning the printing business in the office of the Enterprise, under the late John M. Reed. After serving a three years apprenticeship he returned to Two Rivers and again attended school for six months, realizing the value of an education. He then resumed work at the printer’s trade, entering the office of the Manitowoc County Chronicle at Two Rivers, where he was employed until the close of the year 1882. On the 5th of January, 1883, he returned to Kewaunee and purchased the Enterprise of Edward Decker and V. Mashek, who had purchased the paper of Mr. Reed. Mr. Voshardt made several improvements in the plant and in 1891 enlarged the sheet from an eight-column folio to a six-column quarto. As time went on he added still other improvements and in the same year introduced the first cylinder press in Kewaunee county. His aim was to give patrons a bright, clean, newsy sheet and that he accomplished this was indicated by his growing subscription list. The paper was well printed, was neat and attractive in appearance and gave a correct and unprejudiced account of local and national affairs. The Enterprise was published in support of democratic principles for Mr. Voshardt was always an earnest believer in the platforms of the party. On the 22d of September, 1883, occurred the marriage of Mr. Voshardt to Miss Katie L. Apel, of Two Rivers, a daughter of August and Catherine (Rock) Apel, both of whom were born on the Rhine in Germany. When a young man the father came to America, establishing his home at Two Rivers, where he engaged in the saloon business. In politics he was a democrat and was active in the public life of his community. He died in the ‘80s, while his wife passed away in 1893. They were the parents of two children, Mrs. Voshardt and Mrs. William Nash. To Mr. and Mrs. Voshardt was born a son, Orme, whose birth occurred January 5, 1885. He was educated in the schools of Kewaunee and ten years ago, when his father died, he came to Two Rivers, where he entered the employ of the Hamilton Manufacturing Company and has since been connected with this firm. Mr. Voshardt was a devoted husband and father, regarding no sacrifice on his part too great that would promote the welfare and happiness of his wife and child. At all times he manifested a public-spirited devotion to the general welfare and was closely identified with city and county interests. Progress was his watchword and this characteristic of his life was manifest during his connection with the city council and with the school board. It was said of him that “The current of his life was so even and peaceful that it attracted comparatively little notice in the turmoil of human affairs, yet he pursued his way with such patient and persistent industry, care and force that he far outstripped in material success many others who were provided with better opportunities.” His life was indeed well and worthily spent and the high regard entertained for him was justly won.