MANITOWOC COUNTY PERSONAL SKETCHES

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HENRY HEAP From the Manitowoc Pilot, 22 April 1875: Probate office, Manitowoc, April 19th, A.D. 1875 In the matter of the Proof and Probate of the last Will and testament of Henry Heap deceased, late of the County of Manitowoc. Whereas, an instrument in writing, purporting to be the last Will and Testament of Henry Heap deceased, late of the County of Manitowoc, has been filed in this office; and whereas application has been made by Luke Wilde of Manitowoc praying that the same be proven and admitted to Probate according to the laws of this State: Therefore it is ordered that said application be heard before me at the Probate office in the city of Manitowoc in said County, on the 17th day of May A.D. 1875 at 10 o'clock in the forenoon. (rest of notice is publishing rules) T.G. Olmsted, County Judge

CHARLES F. HECKER From The History of Northern Wisconsin, Vol II. Chicago: Western Historical Pub. Co., 1881, p. 528 Retired, Manitowoc, born Nov. 26, 1819 in Prussia. In 1848, he came to this county, engaged in farming till about 1865; he then removed to the city and opened a general store, which he continued about two years; since then he has been engaged in real estate. In 1874, he built the two-story and basement brick store now occupied by T. C. Buerstatte, druggist. Mr. Hecker has held various local offices. He was married in 1848, to Charlotte Hecker; she is a native of Prussia. They have two daughters, Miss Charlotte, now engaged in teaching school, and Miss Augusta, engaged in music teaching. She first took a course of studies with Prof. Buling, of Manitowoc, and later, two courses with Prof. Luneng, of Milwaukee.

CHARLES HEIN This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.370-371. Those travelers whose duties call them to Reedsville, Wisconsin, will generally find themselves directed to the hotel of Charles Hein, one of the most popular establishments in this part of Manitowoc county, where every comfort is provided for guests and the conveniences of which are modern in every respect. Mr. Hein was born December 27, 1864, in Manitowoc Rapids, Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, a son of William and Elizabeth (Kugler) Hein, natives of Germany, who were married in Wisconsin. After their marriage they settled in Manitowoc Rapids, where Mr. Hein, who was a millwright by trade, worked in the saw and grist mills until his death in 1897, at the age of sixty-nine years, his widow surviving him until 1902 and dying at the age of sixty-four. Both are buried in the Lutheran cemetery in the town of Liberty. Charles Hein was the fifth of a family of twelve children, and at the age of twenty-one years he commenced working for wages at the trade of cooper, continuing in that occupation until 1897, and then engaged in the hotel business, in which he has continued to the present time. The service and cuisine at Mr. Hein’s hostelry are excellent, and the host and hostess do everything in their power to make their guests feel at home. In 1892 Mr. Hein was married to Miss Bertha Boelk, daughter of Daniel and Louisa Boelk, natives of Germany who were married in Wisconsin, and both are now living in the town of Maple Grove. Mrs. Hein died in 1898, aged twenty-seven years, and is buried in the Lutheran cemetery at Reedsville. Three children were born to this union, two of whom died in infancy, while Elmer is unmarried and lives at home. In 1902 Mr. Hein was married again to Miss Ida Boettcher, the fifth of the six children of William and Amelia Boettcher, natives of Germany who were married in Wisconsin and are now living in Reedsville. Mrs. Hein was born January 13, 1876. One child has been born to this union, Edna, who is attending school. In addition to his hotel, Mr. Hein is the owner of some valuable city property, he is a prominent democrat, has served nine years as clerk of the village of Reedsville and is now serving in his second term as deputy county sheriff. He and Mrs. Hein are members of the German Lutheran church of Reedsville.

EDWARD HEIN This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.178-179. Edward Hein, whose energies have always been devoted to agricultural pursuits, is one of the capable farmers of Manitowoc Rapids township. He was born in Rapids, this county, on the 26th of August, 1866, and is a son of William and Elizabeth (Couglar) Hein, whose family numbered twelve. The parents were both natives of Germany, and there the father, whose birth occurred in 1831, was reared and educated and learned the miller’s and millwright’s trades. He continued to follow these in his native land until he had attained the age of twenty-two years, when he determined to become a citizen of the United States. He emigrated to America in 1853, settling in Manitowoc Rapids township, where he and his wife thereafter made their home. In 188o he purchased the farm on which our subject now resides. This contained a sawmill that Mr. Hein operated in connection with general farming until his death in 1898. Edward Hein was educated in the district schools of this township, and after he had acquired such knowledge as was deemed essential to enable him to assume the heavier responsibilities of life he laid aside his text-books and gave his entire attention to the work of the farm and the operation of the mill. He was still quite young when he was assigned duties about the fields and mill, his responsibilities increasing as his strength developed with the passing years. When he was twenty-two he left home and went to Minnesota and Dakota, where he farmed for seven years. At the expiration of that period he returned to this county, and upon the death of his mother in 1902, he bought the old home farm and here he has ever since resided. On the 2d of January, 1901, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Hein and Miss Frances Hastreiter, a daughter of Frank and Victoria Hastreiter. She was born in Bohemia and was reared in the faith of the Roman Catholic church. During tbe period of his residence on the old farm, Mr. Hein has effected extensive changes, having erected several new buildings, and improved and remodeled some of the old ones, and he has also added to his equipment. He takes great pride in his property, which is endeared to him by boyhood associations and on which he has expended the best of his endeavors.

EMILIE HEINRICH 1938 newspaper clipping: Maple Grove Pioneer To Be 86 Years Old; Recalls Early Days in This County. The woman who walked barefooted the snow-covered wilderness for 22 miles from the town of Maple Grove to Appleton on the first of February in 1868 because she could not decide to accept a proposal of marriage, will be 86 years old on Thursday, September 1st. She is Mrs. Emilie Heinrich, and she will celebrate her birthday at the town of Maple Grove farm which has been her home since she went as a bride to live on it, for she did accept the proposal, although it was only after her husband-to-be went to Appleton to change her mind. Details of her life the first few years after she came to America Mrs. Heinrich tells from dim recollections and from stories her parents told her, for she was only a little more than two years old when her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Schilling, brought her here from West Prussia. The family spent the summer in Illinois after they arrived in America, and then headed north. When they got to Wisconsin they lived temporarily in a makeshift lean-to until Mr. Schilling and his brother-in-law, who had emigrated with the Schilling family, could construct a cabin out of logs a half a mile from the home where Mrs. Heinrich still lives. There were no nails, and the walls were held together with pegs. A door for which there was no lock and a hole in the roof to let out the smoke were the only sources of light and air. For five years the family was without a stove or lamp. The fireplace served as both. Split basswood was used to construct a rude table and bedstead and a few chairs. In lieu of lime, a mixture of red clay and gravel, with some pig bristles thrown in as an adhesive, was used to close the apertures between the logs. "Father bought 80 acres at two dollars an acre"' Mrs. Heinrich said. "After we got our homestead settled, father began to make shingles to take to Manitowoc to exchange for food and clothing. It took four days to make the trip, with a steer to pull the load." Mrs. Heinrich thinks the world is going "soft." "Today it would kill a cow to be driven to Manitowoc, much less to pull something to Manitowoc!" Grass and leaves were the only food the farm animals had to eat. A neighbor gave Mrs. Heinrich's mother a pan of barley to roast for coffee, but Mrs. Schilling carefully put it aside and used it for planting the next spring. Bread was the family's chief sustenance. The dough was placed on a stone that had been pre-heated in the fireplace. A kettle was placed over the dough, and a fire built around the kettle to bake the bread. This method the Schillings used until Mrs. Schilling's brother built a large stone oven outdoors. In it 12 loaves could be baked at once. Meat was on the family board only when a wild animal was killed, or when a wild animal killed one of the farm herd. The children harvested nuts each autumn and Mrs. Heinrich recalls wishing for storms so that the nuts would be shaken from the trees. The community's first cemetery was on Mrs. Heinrich's father's land, and the first man buried in it was a certain Mr. Falkenstein who was killed under a falling tree. "Cleared" land in the days when Mrs. Heinrich was a girl was land on which trees were cut, but the stumps stood because there was no dynamite to blast them. Mrs. Heinrich recalls helping with the plowing, which was done with difficulty between the stumps. Mrs. Heinrich's 7-year-old brother went to the woods one day, she recalls, to join his father and uncle at wood cutting. A large black animal came through the woods, and the child, unafraid, approached it and played with it for a few minutes. Then the animal, a black bear, went its way and a short time later the squeals of a pig told the cutters that the bear had killed one of the farm animals. Night noises around the cabin were punctuated by the cry of wolves. It was through wilderness like this that Emilie walked to Appleton when she was not yet 16 years old. Her sister was married and living there, and she determined to seek household employment there, after young Jacob Heinrich had asked her father for her hand in marriage. Her sister persuaded her that she was striking a bad bargain by choosing employment over marriage, and finally Emilie was won. The wedding party assembled at the Heinrich home a few days later and had to wait a whole day before a justice could get to the home to perform the marriage. There was no clergyman available at that time, although the Schillings were devout members of the Evangelical faith. Ten children were born to the Heinrichs and Mrs. Heinrich never had the ministrations of a physician at childbirth. "The neighbor women just helped each other when a child came," she said in matter-of-fact fashion. Not having a doctor, however, was a serious thing when, for instance, a man broke an arm, as her father did when he was preparing flax one summer. The arm was set as best a neighbor could set it, but it never knit, and it was a useless member thereafter. Seven of Mrs. Heinrich's children are living. They are Christian, Charles and Arthur of the town of Maple Grove (Arthur on the homestead farm), Jacob J. of Appleton, Mrs. Herman Freitag of Wayside, Mrs. Ben Nohr of Lark and Mrs. Clarence Peters of Breckenridge, Minn. Hardships she suffered in youth have made a sturdy old age for Mrs. Heinrich. She reads a great deal, although she had only a very short formal education, and even now does not use glasses. Fine fancywork occupies much of her time, and her flower garden is her price. She assists her daughter-in-law with the work around the house and does much of the garden work. Last spring she went with Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Heinrich to the Dakotas on a pleasure trip and she stood the long ride as well as if it were a daily habit with her. It will be "open house" Thursday for the friends whom Mrs. Heinrich has made over 86 years.

EMILIE HEINRICH

RUDOLPH HEINS This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.629-630. Rudolph Heins, a leading merchant of Kiel, and one of the progressive business men of Manitowoc county, was born in this city, November 9, 1869, being a son of Carl and Dorothy (Jensen) Heins. Carl Gottlieb Heins was born at Itzehoe, Germany, and came to the United States when twenty years old. He had been educated in Germany and later on was employed in a grocery store and learned the process of sugar refining. After arriving in this country, he located at New Holstein, where he bought a small tract of land which he cleared. Seeing a suitable opening in the mercantile line, he bought ground at Sheboygan, put up a small general store, and often walked to his shop in the morning. Later on, he formed a partnership with Rudolph Puchner, but selling his interest, opened the first general store in Kiel. This he conducted until his death, June 27, 1908. He was a man who inspired absolute confidence, and his associates often took his advice in the settlement of disputes. From the time of its organization, until his death, he acted as president of the State Bank of Kiel. He was the first president of the village and was reelected several times. With the exception of several years, he served as justice of the peace during all of his residence in Kiel, was village clerk and held offices of lesser importance. One of the organizers of the Kiel Woodenware Company, he was its treasurer for many years, and few measures of importance were carried out without his sanction. Fraternally, he was an Odd Fellow. His wife was a native of Germany, and they were married at New Holstein, Wisconsin. Seven children survive: Helen, the wife of Dr. A. R. Wittman, of Merrill, Wisconsin; Minnie, at home; Carl; Pauline, now Mrs. Jacob B. Laun of Kiel; Rudolph; Clara, now Mrs. Albert W. Dassler of Kiel; and Arthur, of Tigerton, a hardware merchant. One son, William, died when five years old. Rudolph Heins attended the public schools of Kiel and the Oakwood Normal School, and being thus well prepared, he entered a general store in western Iowa as a clerk. After two years there, he returned to Kiel to go into his father’s store as a partner, and when the latter died, Mr. Heins succeeded to the sole managment. The business founded by the elder Mr. Heins is being conducted according to the standards raised by the old pioneer merchant, combined with natural changes necessitated by the progress of the times. On August 14, 1894, he was married to Anna Dassler, daughter of Herman and Minnie Dassler. Mr. Dassler is a carpenter and contractor of Manitowoc. Two children have been born of this marriage, Margarete and Richard, both students. He belongs the the Equitable Fraternal Union and the Kiel Band Association.

Lehrer means instructor
Photo from Zur Erinnerung An Das Funfzigjahrige Jubilaum (First German Evangelical)Manitowoc, Wisconsin 1855-1905 Jubilee date was 7 Februar 1905, book is in the Manitowoc Library.

WILL HELWIG this picture sent in by family researcher, see contributors page.

Mr. and Mrs. Will Helwig

HEINRICH HEMPSCHEMEYER From the Manitowoc Pilot, 22 April 1875: In Probate - Manitowoc County Court In the matter of the estate of Heinrich Hempschemeyer deceased. On reading and filing the petitions of Mary Koepsel of Newton, Manitowoc county, representing among other things that Heinrich Hempschemeyer late of the town of Newton, Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, on the 8th day of February A.D. 1875, at said town and county, died intestate, leaving goods, chattels, and estate within this State, Wisconsin and that the said petitioner is daughter of said deceased, and praying that administration of said estate be to her granted, it is ordered that said petitioner be heard before the Judge of this Court on Monday, the 26th day of April A.D. 1875 at 10 o'clock A.M. at my office in said county. (rest of notice is publishing rules) T.G. Olmsted, County Judge

WILLIAM H. HEMSCHEMEYER Soldiers’ And Citizens’ Album Biographical Record Grand Army Of The Republic 1888 Pages 589-590: WILLIAM H. HEMSCHEMEYER, a resident at Manitowoc, Wis., and a member of G.A.R. Post No. 18, was born May 19, 1833, in Hanover, Germany. When he was 14 years old he came to America with his parents, C. H. and Sophia (Rickmann) Hemschemeyer, and they located on a farm in Manitowoc county, Wis., where he assisted his father until he was 19 years old, with the exception of winter seasons, when he attended school. In 1852 he engaged in business, in which he operated until the second call of the President for troops in the first year of the civil war. August 21, 1862, he enlisted in Company F, 26th Wisconsin Infantry, at Manitowoc for three years. He passed through the several non-commissioned grades and was commissioned 1st Lieutenant of Company I of the same command, April 13, 1864. Oct. 19th of the same year he was promoted to the Captaincy of Company I and was mustered out as such. He was in the first regiment raised for Sigel’s command in Wisconsin and left the State for Washington, October 6th. He was in the movements to Gainesville, and afterwards to Falmouth, and did not miss the “Mud Campaign” at a later date. He was in the disastrous battle of Chancellorsville, fought afterwards at Gettysburg, and went with the command to join the troops in the West and was in the action at Wauhatchie on the Tennessee. He fought at Mission Ridge and went thence to Knoxville and back to Lookout, and in May was in the reconnoissance and skirmishing at Buzzard Roost. He was in the fight at Resaca, Pumpkin Vine Creek, in the movements at Kenesaw Mountain and in the fight at Peach Tree Creek, in the siege of Atlanta and started with Sherman in November for the march to the sea and traveled through Georgia 34 days, engaged in the varied operation which marked the progress of the triumphal march. He was in the fight at Averysboro in March and was under fire at Bentonville, three days later, going thence to Goldsboro and Raleigh, where the command delayed until the surrender of General Johnston, when he again took up the line of march and journeyed for weary days through heat and dust to Washington, where he was a participant in the Grand Review. The regiment left Washington June 13th and reached Milwaukee on the 17th, where it was welcomed by the German citizens, and was soon after paid off and discharged. After his return home Mr. Hemschemeyer was engaged in the sale of groceries and afterward in the management of a hotel in which he was occupied 10 years. In 1886 he opened a hotel at Silver Lake, four miles from Manitowoc, at a point which is rapidly becoming noted and popular as a summer resort. He was married August 20, 1856, to Wilhelmina Storch at New Bremen, Ohio. They have three children, a son and two daughters, all of whom are deceased. Mr. Hemschemeyr has officiated as City Clerk of Manitowoc and as Register of Deeds of the county. He has acted in the capacity of Justice of the Peace and Deputy Revenue collector and served his District in the State Assembly in 1879 and 1880. He is a citizen of recognized ability and is esteemed and respected for the quality of his service in every public capacity. (sent in by researcher/see contributors page/Soldiers’ And Citizens’ Album)

JOSEPH HEMPTON From the "History of the Great Lakes" vol. 2 by J.B. Mansfield 1899 Joseph Hempton, an ardent member of the Marine Engineers Beneficial Association and well known to the fraternity in Duluth, Minn., was born in Manitowoc, Wis., December 4, 1854. His parents, William and Margaret (Dunham) Hempton, were natives of Toronto, Ontario, and Vermont, respectively, and as early as 1832 both came west and located in Manitowoc, where they met and were married. Joseph Hempton received his primary education in the schools of his native place, and in the spring of 1882 began his marine career as fireman on the tug Bob Nobles, on Sturgeon bay. Toward the close of the season she was destroyed by fire, the crew reaching shore in a small boat, and they walked to Menominee, where they were treated as kindly as shipwrecked sailors usually are. The next season Mr. Hempton shipped as fireman in the tug Ben Drake, and during that winter he applied for an engineer's license, after obtaining which he ran the Drake two seasons. In 1884 he engineered the tug Nelson, and then ran a stationary engine for some time. In 1889 Mr. Hempton again took up his marine life, entering the employ of Capt. J.H. Dunham, of Chicago, as engineer of the tug A. Miller. The following spring he shipped as second engineer in the steamer Mary Mills, plying between Chicago and Menominee in the lumber trade, and his next boat was the Eugene Hart, plying on Saginaw bay, of which he was also second engineer. In the spring of 1892 he was appointed chief engineer of the Nelson, running her until October, when he laid his boat up and entered the employ of Whiteside, Torgelson & Shaw, as engineer of their flouring-mill, operating a Corliss engine. In 1894 he went to Menominee, where he was appointed chief engineer of the side-wheel steamer M. M. Chester, plying in the fruit trade. It was in 1896 that he came to Duluth, Minn., where he entered the employ of Capt. B. B. Inman as engineer of the tug Joseph Dudley, transferring the next season to the tug A. C. Adams. In the spring of 1898 Mr. Hempton was given the position of chief engineer on the tug Hattie Lloyd, operated by the Independent Ferry Company, between Duluth and West Superior. He makes his home in Duluth.

W.H. HEMSCHEMEYER From The History of Northern Wisconsin, Vol II. Chicago: Western Historical Pub. Co., 1881, p. 528 Justice of the Peace, Manitowoc. Was born May 19, 1833 in Hanover, Germany. In 1848, he came with his parents to Manitowoc County, and until the age of nineteen he attended school and assisted on their farm; he then engaged in mercantile pursuits till 1862, when he entered the army of the rebellion. He held commissions both as lieutenant and captain, remaining in the service till July, 1865; he participated in the battles of Fredricksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and in 1863, their corps was transferred to the Army of the Cumberland, and participated in the battle of Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Sherman's march to the sea, and others; he returned to Manitowoc and again engaged in mercantile pursuits till 1877. He has held the offices of City Clerk, Register of Deeds, and has been a member of the Assembly for the Third District, for 1879 and 1880; he was also a delegate in 1880, to the Republican National Convention at Chicago, from the Fifth Congressional District. ********* SOLDIERS’ AND CITIZENS’ ALBUM BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC 1888 Pages 589-590: WILLIAM H. HEMSCHEMEYER, a resident at Manitowoc, Wis., and a member of G.A.R. Post No. 18, was born May 19, 1833, in Hanover, Germany. When he was 14 years old he came to America with his parents, C. H. and Sophia (Rickmann) Hemschemeyer, and they located on a farm in Manitowoc county, Wis., where he assisted his father until he was 19 years old, with the exception of winter seasons, when he attended school. In 1852 he engaged in business, in which he operated until the second call of the President for troops in the first year of the civil war. August 21, 1862, he enlisted in Company F, 26th Wisconsin Infantry, at Manitowoc for three years. He passed through the several non-commissioned grades and was commissioned 1st Lieutenant of Company I of the same command, April 13, 1864. Oct. 19th of the same year he was promoted to the Captaincy of Company I and was mustered out as such. He was in the first regiment raised for Sigel’s command in Wisconsin and left the State for Washington, October 6th. He was in the movements to Gainesville, and afterwards to Falmouth, and did not miss the “Mud Campaign” at a later date. He was in the disastrous battle of Chancellorsville, fought afterwards at Gettysburg, and went with the command to join the troops in the West and was in the action at Wauhatchie on the Tennessee. He fought at Mission Ridge and went thence to Knoxville and back to Lookout, and in May was in the reconnoissance and skirmishing at Buzzard Roost. He was in the fight at Resaca, Pumpkin Vine Creek, in the movements at Kenesaw Mountain and in the fight at Peach Tree Creek, in the siege of Atlanta and started with Sherman in November for the march to the sea and traveled through Georgia 34 days, engaged in the varied operation which marked the progress of the triumphal march. He was in the fight at Averysboro in March and was under fire at Bentonville, three days later, going thence to Goldsboro and Raleigh, where the command delayed until the surrender of General Johnston, when he again took up the line of march and journeyed for weary days through heat and dust to Washington, where he was a participant in the Grand Review. The regiment left Washington June 13th and reached Milwaukee on the 17th, where it was welcomed by the German citizens, and was soon after paid off and discharged. After his return home Mr. Hemschemeyer was engaged in the sale of groceries and afterward in the management of a hotel in which he was occupied 10 years. In 1886 he opened a hotel at Silver Lake, four miles from Manitowoc, at a point which is rapidly becoming noted and popular as a summer resort. He was married August 20, 1856, to Wilhelmina Storch at New Bremen, Ohio. They have three children, a son and two daughters, all of whom are deceased. Mr. Hemschemeyr has officiated as City Clerk of Manitowoc and as Register of Deeds of the county. He has acted in the capacity of Justice of the Peace and Deputy Revenue collector and served his District in the State Assembly in 1879 and 1880. He is a citizen of recognized ability and is esteemed and respected for the quality of his service in every public capacity.

PATRICK HENNESSEY This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.297-298. Patrick Hennessey, who resides on forty acres of valuable land on section 19, and also owns another tract of forty acres on section 30, Franklin township, is one of the progressive agriculturists of Manitowoc county, and a public-spirited citizen who is held in high esteem by his fellow townsmen. He was born on his present farm, June 27, 1862, and is a son of John and Margaret (Long) Hennessey, natives of Ireland, who were married in Wisconsin and settled on the farm on which Patrick Hennessey now resides. They came here during the late '50s, being one of the early families of Franklin township, and John Hennessey at once erected a log cabin which was the family home while the first clearing was being done on the farm. His first team, purchased after a period of self-sacrificing economy, was an ox team, but as time went on and he became better situated financially he bought stock and implements and erected various substantial buildings for the housing of his animals, grain and equipments, and erected a better home for his family. He died here August 15, 1895, aged seventy-five years, his wife having passed away about 1876, when fifty-five years old, and both are buried in St. Patrick’s cemetery. Mr. Hennessey was a democrat in politics, taking an active interest in public affairs, and served as a member of the school board for a number of years, although he never aspired to public preferment. Patrick Hennessey was the third of his parents’ four children, and he has always remained on the home farm. He now has sixty-nine acres under cultivation, all fenced with barbed and woven wire, and he carries on general farming, marketing dairy products and some hay. He milks thirteen cows, and breeds to Percheron horses. His good farm buildings include a frame barn, thirty-six by seventy feet, built in 1885, and a two-story frame residence, built in 1901. The water supply comes from drilled wells. On January 30, 1892, Mr. Hennessey was married to Miss Mary Sheehy, who was born July 24, 1859, the third of a family of twelve children born to John and Mary (Munhall) Sheehy, natives of Ireland who were married in Wisconsin. After marriage, Mr. Sheehy purchased eighty acres of wild land in Franklin township, where he cut logs and built a cabin, experiencing the usual hardships and privations of the pioneer and eventually becoming a prominent citizen and successful agriculturist. His death occurred on this farm in 1890, when he was seventy-two years of age, his wife surviving him only two months and pass away when fifty-six years of age, both being buried in St. Patrick’s cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. Hennessey have had five children, of whom two, Margaret and Michael, are deceased, while those living are Julia, John and Patrick, Jr. In political matters Mr. Hennessey is a democrat and he has been superintendent of roads for six years. He and his family are members of St. Patrick’s Catholic church of Franklin township.

FRANK F. HENNING "Album of Genealogy and Biography, 1897" President of the German-American Hospital, of Chicago, has been connected with business interests and philanthropic institutions in that city for a third of a century. He was born May 3, 1840, in the city of Gransee, Germany, and is the eldest son of Frederick and Henriette (Kanow) Henning. The family is of Swiss descent, the ancestors having left Switzerland about 1780, on account of religious persecutions. Frederick Henning and his wife were natives of the same part of Germany as their son, Frank F. He was by trade a harness-maker, but later cultivated a farm and, about 1848, decided to emigrate to America, but as his father objected, he went into the country and bought a farm, which he conducted until he came to the United States. In 1855, the parents, with six children, sailed from Bremen on the sailing ship 'Othien,' and five weeks later landed at New York. They came to Chicago, and after remaining a week, removed to Port Washington, Wisconsin. They finally settled about six miles from Manitowoc, Wisconsin, where Frederick Henning bought one hundred sixty acres of timber land, which he cleared, and cultivated several years, He is now living retired in Manitowoc. Of his ten children six were born in the Fatherland and four in Wisconsin. Only five of these are now living, namely: Frank F., the eldest; Paulina, now Mrs. Schroeder; Henrietta, wife of George Bodmer, of Chicago; Emma and Matilda. The mother died in 1893, aged eighty-four years, and the father has reached the age of eighty-six years. Frank F. Henning was reared on his father's farm and educated in the common schools of his native city. In 1859 he left home with only one dollar in his pocket to make his own way in the world. He worked at loading a cargo on a vessel at Manitowoc and unloading it at Chicago, to pay his passage to the latter city. From there he walked to Morris, Illinois, a distance of sixty miles, where he found employment on a farm at eight dollars a month. Here he attended school during the winter of 1859-1860. July 28, 1861, he enlisted at Aurora, for three years, in the Union Army, and was mustered September 12th of that year, in the Thirty-sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, Company D. His regiment was assigned to the Western Division, and saw hard service in Missouri and Arkansas, and he participated in all the engagements where his regiment acted. Mr. Henning's first engagement was at Pea Ridge, and he was wounded at the battle of Stone River in the foot, head and right hip. He was taken, more dead than alive, to the field hospital, and after the wounds were dressed, he was sent to the hospital at Nashville. From here he was sent to Cincinnati, and was discharged in July, 1863, for disability. Upon his discharge he returned to his home in Wisconsin, where he remained until the early spring of 1864, and since that time has been a resident of the city of Chicago. He found employment with Lohn & Koenig, for a time, in gluing chairs; then as salesman and bookkeeper, and in 1867 he bought a quarter interest in the business, the firm then becoming Koenig, Henning & Gamer. Their business was located at Nos. 48 and 50 Fifth Avenue, where the fire of 1871 wiped them out, and left them with a debt of twenty-five thousand dollars, which was the amount of insurance they carried, but they were able to obtain only six thousand dollars therefrom. Immediately after the fire the firm built a furniture factory, and in a year and a-half paid their liabilities. Mr. Henning remained a member of this firm until the spring of 1881. About 1878 a German Young Men's Christian Association was organized, of which Mr. Henning became president; its members visited hospitals, jails and poorhouses. Being of a sympathetic nature, Mr. Henning became interested in the sufferings of humanity and their alleviation, and decided to devote the remainder of his life to philanthropic work. He had acquired a comfortable competence, and when he retired from manufacturing, in December, 1883, he secured the incorporation of the German Hospital, and in 1884 it was opened in a building owned by Mr. Henning. Most of the funds for the foundation of this institution were raised by Mr. Henning, who was its president. It was located at No. 242 Lincoln Avenue, where he donated two years' rent. The present site of this hospital was purchased in 1886, Mr. Henning advancing three thousand dollars for the first payment, and a year later nine thousand dollars for building purposes. Its generous benefactor was president until 1896, when he resigned and withdrew, on account of differences of opinion among some of the directors and physicians. The hospital had accumulated property worth sixty thousand dollars, with an endowment fund of twenty-one thousand dollars, and for thirteen years Mr. Henning had devoted his time and energy to it, with no compensation in money. In 1886 he organized a deaconess' society for the purpose of procuring trained nurses, and failing to get enough in this way, they branched out and erected a large building for a nurses' training school, which is now used as the German-American Hospital. Nurses have received two years' training when they graduate from this institution, and about fifty nurses have been graduated. Thus this institution is not only a hospital, but a training school for nurses. The noble founder cared not for honor or glory to himself in this good work, but found his compensation in the lives made happier and better, and the benefit of his fellow-creatures from the results of his time and study. In 1893 Mr. Henning was one of the prime movers in organizing the Bethesda Industrial Home, at Morton Grove, Cook County, Illinois, for the aged, infirm and helpless. In 1894, a printing office was established at the home to assist in defraying the expenses. This has proved a success, and there are now two monthy papers issued from it. Mr. Henning has ever since been connected with its management. Though he is a firm supporter of Republican principles, he could never be induced to accept office for himself. He has been twice married. June 28, 1866, he wedded Miss Dorothy Gamus, a native of Hanover, Germany, and they had six children, of whom three are living, namely: Frank, Arthur, and Oswald. The mother died in 1881. February 28, 1883, he was united in marriage with Miss Emily Buerstatte, daughter of Henry and Maria (Meister) Buerstatte. She was born in Manitowoc, Wisconsin. They have three children, Meta, Laura, and Walter. Mr. Henning has a wide circle of friends and acquaintances, and is known for his good works in all parts of the great metropolis. His example is worthy of study and emulation, and he is honored and admired by all. He has been connected with the Chicago Avenue Church (Moody's) a number of years.

FREDERICK HENNING From the Manitowoc Pilot, March 10, 1870: IN PROBATE - Manitowoc County court In the matter of the estate of Frederick Henning, deceased. On reading and filing the petition of John Frederick Henning, of Manitowoc in said county, representing among other things that Frederick Henning, late of said county, on the 9th day of April A.D. 1868, near Waukegan, Ill., died intestate, leaving no goods, or chattels and no estate within this state, and that the said petitioner is father of said deceased, and praying thatadministration be to him granted, it is ordered that said petition be heard before the judge of this court on Friday the 25th day of March A.D. 1870, at 10 o'clock a.m., at my office in said county. Ordered further, that notice thereof be given to the heirs of said deceased, and to all persons interested, by publishing a copy of this order for three successive weeks prior to said day of hearing in The Manitowoc Pilot, a weekly newspaper printed and published at Manitowoc in said county. W.W. Waldo, County Judge Manitowoc, March 3d, 1870

GEORGE HENSCHEL This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.594-594. George Henschel is engaged in blacksmithing at Kiel and the shop which he now owns and conducts was the first establishment of the kind in the town. He was born in Russell township, Sheboygan county, December 4, 1877. His father, Louis Henschel, a native of Germany, came to America with his parents in his boyhood days, the family home being established in Russell township at a period when the work of development and improvement had scarcely been begun there. The grandfather followed the occupation of farming throughout his entire life and Louis Henschel was reared to that pursuit. He worked on the old homestead in his youth and early manhood and later he took up farming on his own account, clearing a tract of land in the midst of the forest and there developing his fields. For a half century he has lived upon the place which is still his home but he is now retired from business cares at the age of seventy-seven years. He married Louisa Buchman who died in 1911 when sixty-six years of age. Unto them were born ten children: Louis, now living in Holstein, Wisconsin; Philip, a resident of Russell township; Charles, whose home is in Hansonville, Wisconsin; George, of this review; Adam, living near Milwaukee; Jacob, of Kiel; John, a farmer of Hubert, Wisconsin; Ida, the wife of Robert Mattes, of Kiel; Bertha, the wife of Jacob Rockless, of Milwaukee; and Emma, the wife of John Rockless, of Kiel. George Henschel was a pupil in the public schools near his father’s farm and later took up the business of cheese making. He afterward turned his attention to blacksmithing which he followed for three years in the employ of Charles Weiskopf of Kiel, after which he went to Adell, Wisconsin, and also spent some time in Plymouth, working at his trade. In the year 1900 he bought a smithy at Hansonville and conducted it until 1906 when he sold out and made a prospecting trip to the western coast. There he lived for one year after which he returned to Kiel and purchased the Gus Wimmer blacksmith shop, not only the oldest establishment of this kind in Kiel but also in this section of the state. It was the first industry opened in the town and has been conducted continuously since. Mr. Henschel was married in 1902 to Miss Katie Spranger, who was born in Ryan township, Sheboygan county, in 1882, a daughter of August and Sophia (Schuelen) Spranger, who are now living at Kokomo, Indiana, where her father carries on farming. Mr. Henschel was reared in the Reformed church and holds membership in the congregation of that denomination at Kiel. He is also connected with the Modern Woodmen of America there. He is interested in various measures relating to public progress and improvement and his cooperation can be counted upon to further projects for the general good, yet his time and attention are chiefly concentrated upon his business affairs.

EISEBINS HENSEL From the Manitowoc Pilot, March 10, 1870: IN PROBATE - Manitowoc County court. In the matter of the estate of Eisebins Hensel, deceased. On reading and filing the petition of Charles Eigledinger, of said county, representing among other things that Eisebins Hensel, late of said county, on the 20th day of February, A.D. 1870, at said county, died intestate, leaving goods, chattels and estate within this state, and that the said petitioner is next of kin of said deceased, and praying that administration of said estate be to him granted, it is ordered that said petition be heard before judge of this court, on Monday, the 21st day of March A.D. 1870, at 10 o'clock A.M., at my office in said county. Ordered further, that notice thereof be given to the heirs of said deceased, and to all persons interested, by publishing a copy of this order for three successive weeks prior to said day of hearing, in The Manitowoc Pilot, a weekly newspaper published at Manitowoc in said county. W.W. Waldo, County Judge Manitowoc, Feb. 24th, 1870

REV. PAUL E. HERB This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.605-606. Rev. Paul E. Herb, pastor of St. Michael’s congregation of the Catholic church at Whitelaw, Wisconsin, was born May 3, 1880, at South Osborne, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, and is a son of Daniel and Thecla (Saenger) Herb, natives of Baden, Germany, who were married in Wisconsin and today reside in Appleton. Father Herb was the ninth of a family of ten children, and received his preliminary education in the district schools of South Osborne, later attending St. Joseph’s school in Appleton and taking the classic and philosophical courses at St. Lawrence University, Mount Calvary, Fond du Lac county, and theology at the University of Innsbruck, Tyrol, Austria, where he was ordained August 26, 1903. Father Herb’s first appointment was as assistant at St. Mary’s church, Oshkosh, and in January, 1905, he received his present appointment. St. Michael’s church was organized in 1872, the first church building being erected in 1873, and Father Adler, of Manitowoc Rapids, blessed it and attended it as a mission until 1876, when Rev. Godfrey Nolver took charge of Rapids, with this church as a mission. In 1881 Rev. John Rhode of Clarks Mills took charge of this, still as a mission, and during the same year built a parochial school. In 1882 he moved here and became the first resident pastor. Being transferred in 1896 to Hilbert, he was succeeded by Rev. Joseph Hemmer, the latter having charge until November, 1897, when he in turn was succeeded by Rev. Joseph Mack, who in 1903 built a new schoolhouse at a cost of four thousand dollars. This school has today ninety pupils, taught by two sisters from St. Francis, Wisconsin. In January, 1905, Rev. Herb took charge of the congregation, which consists of one hundred and two families, all of whom are German but six, and since that time the new church, which cost in round numbers twenty-six thousand dollars, has been built. Father Herb is a learned and zealous priest and is, as well, an excellent business man, being able to so conduct affairs that his parish is always confident of financial prosperity. He is honored and revered by his people, and is highly esteemed by those outside of his religion as well.

JOE HERIAN From the Two Rivers Manitowoc County Chronicle, Tuesday, February 14, 1888: Joe Herian and Mary Barta of Two Creeks were united in holy bonds of matrimony Tuesday, Feb. 7, '88. A reception was given at the residence of the brides' parents, which was attended by a goodly crowd. The groom is the brother of Jno. Herian our popular saddler.

CHARLES F. HERZOG This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.402-403. The business interests of Manitowoc have a worthy and successful representative in Charles F. Herzog, who is well known in this city from his connection with the livery business. He was born in Racine, Wisconsin, September 19, 1865, his parents being William A. and Mary E. (Cornwall) Herzog, the father a native of Germany and the mother of the state of New York. In 1867 the father settled at Nashotah, and a short time afterward removed to Manitowoc, Wisconsin, where he engaged in the livery business, with which he was connected until the time of his death. He passed away November 29, 1902, at the age of sixty-seven, and his wife died in June, 1910. In their family were six children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the third in order of birth. Charles F. Herzog received a common-school education and on starting out in life for himself, entered the employ of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad, where he remained for eight years, a part of which time he served in the capacity of conductor. Subsequently he took up the transfer business, which he followed until his fathers death, when he took charge of the livery business, in which he remained until 1907. In that year he established the livery barn with which he is now connected. On the 24th of October, 1886, Mr. Herzog married Miss Mary Porten, a daughter of Peter and Catherine (Gordenberger) Porten, both of whom were natives of Germany, the father being a farmer in this county. To Mr. and Mrs. Herzog has been born one child, Esta C., who is married and has one son, Charles H. Her husband is now associated in the livery business with Mr. Herzog. Fraternally Mr. Herzog is a member of the Royal League, the Knights of Pythias and the Fraternal Order of Eagles. Mr. Herzog is very successful in the livery business and an investigation of his life's history, both in business and social relations, brings forth many sterling characteristics that are worthy of emulation and of commendation.

CHARLES F. HERZOG (from Manitowoc Pilot 8 Jan. 1903) The marriage of Miss Lillian Schweitzer and Edward Herzog took place on New Year's day at St. James Episcopal Church and was a quiet celebration, only the attendants being present. They were: Miss Mabel Herzog and Edward Schweitzer. A wedding breakfast was served at the home of the bride's parents. The couple are spending their honeymoon at Milwaukee and Racine.

MARIA CHRISTINE HESS This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.386-389. Maria Christine Hess, who resides at No. 920 South Twelfth street, is a native resident of Manitowoc. She was a daughter of Herman and Maria Christine Spoentgen and was born at the old family homestead which was located on the site of her present home. In 1863 the parents came from Germany to America, making their way to Manitowoc, Wisconsin, where the father was engaged for some time in the whipsaw contracting business. In later life he worked at various other trades that helped him to obtain an honest living for his family. He was a thrifty, energetic man and was highly honored by all who knew him. He reared a family of five sons and five daughters, all of whom are today industrious citizens of his adopted country. They are as follows: Henry, a retail boot and shoe merchant of Manitowoc; Catherine, now Mrs. James Damey, of Chicago; Elizabeth, who is the wife of Henry Hess, of Bluff City, Kansas; Wilhelmine, who was educated in Manitowoc and makes her home with her sister, Mrs. Maria C. Hess; Herman, of Manitowoc, who is a traveling salesman; Ernest Mathew, a salesman of Chicago; John Frederick, who is employed as a clerk by his brother Henry; George P., a lithographer for the Chicago Tribune; Helen Anne, who married Albert Guito Meier, a professor in the Central high school at St. Paul, Minnesota; and Maria Christine Hess. The last named was reared in this city and received her education in the public schools here. She remained at home with her parents until she was twenty-one years of age, when she went to Chicago. There she met Phillip John Hess, whom she wedded August 15, 1894. Mr. Hess was a moulder by trade and was employed in that city. Three years after their marriage, or in 1897, Mr. Hess passed away, leaving Mrs. Hess of this review with one daughter, Helen Elsa, who is now a student in the high school of this city. Mrs. Hess, ever true to her husband’s memory, has not married again, has reared her daughter through her own efforts and is now giving her an education. Mrs. Hess has been very capable in her business management and owns the beautiful home in which she resides and, in association with her sister Wilhelmine, has other real estate in this city. In the business partnership of these sisters there exists a splendid harmony that is worthy of the highest commendation. Mrs. Hess, having resided in this city, for many years, is well known here and is highly honored by all her acquaintances.

CHARLES K. HESSEL This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.29-30. Charles K. Hessel, whose able management of a fine tract of farming land stamps him as one of the skilled agriculturists of Rapids, Wisconsin, was born February 20, 1872, on the old Hessel family homestead in the town of Kossuth, Manitowoc county, and belongs to one of this section’s old and honored families. John Hessel, grandfather of our subject, was a native of Germany, and came to the United States with his wife, Mary, and a child who was named after her mother. Settling in the town of Kossuth, Mr. Hessel took up a tract of wild land and built a log cabin, which was the family home for several years, and here he met an accidental death while hunting. His widow was left with three children, and hired a hand to complete the clearing of the farm, and while this was done one of the children, Margaret, was killed by a falling tree. Later Mrs. Hessel was married to John Crumick. Jacob Hessel, the father, was born in the little log cabin on the homestead, and as a youth was engaged in helping to clear the land. He continued to assist his stepfather until his mother’s death, at which time he took charge of the Kossuth property, and he is now living retired in a comfortable cottage which he himself built, his son, Robert, now being the manager of the property. Jacob Hessel married Caroline Kiel, who was born in the town of Kossuth, daughter of Charles Kiel, and four sons and two daughters were born to this union. Charles K. Hessel received a district-school education, and his youth was spent much the same as that of other farmers’ sons of his day. In 1901 he decided to engage in farming on his own account and invested his savings in his present property, the development of which has occupied his time and attention ever since. He ranks high as an agriculturist, and although he has never engaged actively in politics, he is well informed in matters of a public nature and takes a keen interest in affairs that pertain to his community. Mr. Hessel was married in October, 1898, to Miss Emma Seidel, who was born in the town of Kossuth, a daughter of Michael Seidel, and two children have been born to this union: Marie, who was born November 7, 1901; and Loretta, born March 20, 1908. Mr. and Mrs. Hessel are consistent members of the Catholic church in Manitowoc.

LOUIS HEYROTH From the Two Rivers Reporter, Saturday, March 28, 1914: OLD TIMERS - (photo with article) The oldest old settler in this vicinity is Mrs. Louis Heyroth age 93. Last week Friday with the assistance of many friends and relatives she celebrated her birthday at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Winkelmiller with whom she has made her home for the past four years. She was born Sophia Magdalena Bohlman, born in Marianrode, Hanover, Germany, and came with a brother to Sheboygan County in 1853. There she resided a year when she was married to Mr. Louis Heyroth. Mrs. Heyroth is an unusually rational and well preserved woman for one so old. She is still in possession of all her faculties. Her hearing is very good. Her sight is quite good and in fact she never has worn spectacles although she has read much and today she occasionally threads a needle and does some sewing. Her appetite is good and her hair has not yet turned grey. She is gifted with a well preserved memory and recalls songs that were sung in the fatherland when she was but a girl She remembers well the One Hundred Year Rosebush that never failed to blossom every year at Hilesheim where she frequently visited in girlhood days. Her grandson Ferdinand saw this rosebush still flourishing when he visited this locality a few years ago. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Heyroth made their home on their farm consisting of eighty acres near Mishicot. Here they lived from 1854 to 1903 and here were born to them two sons Louis and Ferdinand and their daughter Mrs. Richard Winkelmiller. After conducting a store for a few years at Mishicot Mr. Heyroth retired to live on the farm with his son for a few years before he and his wife went to live with the son at Manitowoc where Mr. Heyroth died six years ago. Grandma Heyroth is a kind and sympathetic old lady who delights to talk of incidents and events of former days. Her mind is clear and her general condition indicates that she will live for some years notwithstanding her four score and thirteen already reached. --------------- From the Two Rivers Reporter, Friday, March 24, 1916: THE OLDEST INHABITANT - (photo with article) Mrs. Louise Heyroth one of our "old timers" was greeted by many friends on Monday it being her 95th birthday anniversary. Up to a few months ago she was up and around and in possession of all her faculties but now she is confined to her bed most of the time. She is possessed of a remarkable memory and takes a lively interest in affairs. She resides with her daughter Mrs. Winkelmiller. ----------- From The History of Northern Wisconsin, Vol II. Chicago: Western Historical Pub. Co., 1881, p. 541 Louis Heyroth, farmer, Sec. 32, P. O. Mishicott, was born June 10, 1824 in Prussia;in 1848 came to Sheboygan; in 1849 came to Milwaukee; thence to Racine County, where he worked on a farm; in 1850, came to Two Rivers; worked for H. H. Smith about six months. In 1851, removed to Mishicott and rented forty acres of land; he afterward bought other forty acres; he then engaged in hauling lumber for the Wisconsin Leather Company, and since 1852 he has been engaged in farming. Owns 180 acres of land, about eighty acres of which is improved. In 1872, he opened a store in Mishicott, which business he sold out to his son, in 1879. Married, in 1855, to Sophia Bohlman, of Hanover. They have three children, two sons and one daughter.

Heyroth Farm Home, Saxonburg, Wisconsin (T. of Mishicott) Photo compliments of Gary Omernick