Veterans of the Korean War

Name	     Rank/Branch   Date of Casualty		Date of Birth

MARTINSON:
ODVIN A      2LT ARMY      06 JULY 1951   KILLED IN ACTION	1924

Second Lieutenant Martinson was a member of the 21st Infantry
Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. He was Killed in Action while
fighting the enemy in North Korea on July 6, 1951. 


MOORE: LAWRENCE A. Moore/Wisconsin/Cpl. Hq. Btry 847 FA BN/Korea/ Feb. 20, 1932 - Dec. 19, 1957


MROTEK: DONALD E PFC ARMY 05 SEP. 1950 KILLED IN ACTION 1930 Photo Private First Class Mrotek was a member of the 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division. He was Killed in Action while fighting the enemy in South Korea on September 5, 1950. Private First Class Mrotek was awarded the Purple Heart, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal and the National Defense Service Medal. ***** Mrotek Reported Missing in Korea A Manitowoc soldier who asked for combat duty twice before his request was granted is missing in action in Korea. He is Pfc. Donald E. Mrotek, 20, who has been missing since Sept. 5, according to word received this week by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edmund Mrotek of 2131 South 16th street. Private Mrotek graduated from Lincoln high school in 1948. The following October he enlisted in the army through the Manitowoc recruiting office and received his basic training at Camp Breckinridge, Ky. He then attended a clerk typist school at Fort Lee, Va. In May, 1949, Private Mrotek was sent overseas and was assigned to an army office in Yokohoma, Japan, When the Korean war broke out he asked for combat duty. He was sent to Korea but was assigned to an office there. He then asked for combat duty again. This time he was assigned to the first cavalry division and was sent into action on July 11. A letter written on the Korean front on Sept. 2 was the last letter received by Mrs. Mrotek from her son. It told of heavy fighting on hill 303. Manitowoc Herald Times, November 17, 1950 P. 14 ******** Mrotek Is Third Korean Casualty A Manitowoc soldier who was reported missing in action in Korea on Nov. 14 is the county’s third casualty in the Korean war, his parents have been informed by the army. He was Pfc. Donald E. Mrotek, 20, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edmund Mrotek of 2131 South 16th? Street, Manitowoc. The parents received word on Nov. 14 that he was missing since Sept. 5. A telegram just received reported he was killed in action on Sept. 5. Private Mrotek graduated from Lincoln high school in 1948. He enlisted in the army the following October and received his basic training at Camp Breckinridge, Ky. After attending a clerk typist school at Fort Lee, Va., he was assigned to an army office in Japan. When the Korean conflict broke out, he asked for combat duty. He was assigned to an office in Korea where he again asked for combat duty. He was then assigned to the first cavalry division and sent into action on July 11. A letter written by him on Sept. 2 and received by his parents told of heavy fighting on hill 303… Manitowoc Herald Times, December 5, 1950 P. 14


OWEN: GLEN R PFC ARMY 14 FEB. 1951 KILLED IN ACTION 1932 Private First Class Owen was a member of Company E, 187th Airborne Infantry Regimental Combat Team. He was Killed in Action while fighting the enemy near Wonju, South Korea on February 14, 1951. Private First Class Owen was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Infantryman's Badge, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal and the National Defense Service Medal. ***** Glen Owen and James King Killed in Fighting in Korea Become Sixth and Seventh Casualties Private Owen, a paratrooper with the 11th airborne division, left California for Wake island Oct. 7, 1950, and was flown from there directly to Korea. He attended Woodrow Wilson junior high school and Manitowoc vocational school prior to his enlistment April 24, 1950, and took basic training at Fort Riley, Kan., and paratroop training at Fort Benning, Ga. Private Owen is survived by his mother; four brothers (private), and a sister (private). Manitowoc Herald Times, Monday, March 5, 1951 p.1 ***** Photo


PANOSH: JAMES A PFC ARMY 07 SEP. 1952 DIED WHILE MISSING 1931 Corporal Panosh was a member of the 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division. He was listed as Missing in Action while fighting the enemy in North Korea on September 7, 1952. He was presumed dead on December 31, 1953. Corporal Panosh was awarded the Purple Heart with Oak Leaf Cluster.


PLINSKE: MYRON DONALD Plinske/Sgt. US Army/Korea/Oct. 7,1928-Feb. 1, 1979


REPENN: JOHN EMIL Repenn/Wisconsin/En. 1 US Coast Guard/World War II/ Korea/Apr. 7, 1917 - Aug. 26, 1972


SCHNEIDER: Donald F. M. Sgt. US Air Force World War II, Korea, Vietnam Dec. 4, 1926-April 20, 1975 ***** Donald F. Schneider, 48, of 825 S. Eighth St., Manitowoc, died Sunday at his residence. Private family funeral services will be at 11 a.m. Wednesday at Pfeffer Funeral Home, Manitowoc, and 11:30 a.m. at St. Isidore Catholic Church, Osman. The Rev. Francis Rose will officiate with burial in the church cemetery. Mr. Schneider was born Dec. 4, 1926, at Osman, son of the late Albert and Stella Weidemann Schneider. He was an army career serviceman, serving in the U.S. Army Air Force for 23 years. He was a member of VFW Post No. 659 of Manitowoc. Survivors include his wife, two sons, (private) and two brothers, (private). Friends may call at Pfeffer Funeral HomeWednesday morning until the time of service. Herald Times Reporter, Manitowoc, April 22, 1975 P. 18


SCHNELL: ELROY A. Schnell/Sgt. Hq. Co. 31 Inf./Korea Cr./1933-1955


SCHULTZ: RICHARD JOSEPH PFC ARMY 02 NOV. 1950 DIED WHILE CAPTURE 1931 Corporal Schultz was a member of the 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division. He was taken Prisoner of War while fighting the enemy near Unsan, North Korea on November 2, 1950 and died while a prisoner on March 31, 1951.


TAYLOR: WILLIAM C., Wisconsin, S.Sgt. US Air Force


TORRISON: JAMES EUGENE Torrison/Pfc. US Army/Korea/1933-1980


TUMA DONALD G Tuma/Pfc. US Army/Korea/October 10, 1935-November 18, 1955 Killed while homeward bound for the holidays from Korean Service. SEATTLE (AP) – Government investigators met here today to begin the work of piecing together the broken fragments of a wrecked airliner and the stories of the people who saw it die. This much they knew. Twenty-seven men died when a big Peninsular Air Transport Co., plane bounced to explosive destruction early yesterday in the backyard of a suburban home. And 47 other persons, including a woman and three small children, survived. There were some discrepancies in the accounts of eyewitnesses and men who were in the plane – as passengers or pilots. And the only sizable remaining piece of the once large DC4 is its tail surface, still resting in a charred backyard amidst a rubble of melted and twisted metal. The investigators said they had no preconceived notions what caused the Miami-based plane to falter two miles south of Boeing Field, its takeoff point, hit a tree, a utility pole, and a garage and then break up and burn in the backyard of the Colin Dearing home. But sabotage, which caused the destruction of a United Air Lines plane near Longmont, Colo., with a loss of 44 lives carry this month, seemed unlikely to David Nelson, supervising agent for the Seattle office of the Civil Aeronautics Administration. Engine Trouble Reported Richard D. Auerbach, special agent incharge of the Seattle Federal Bureau of Investigation Office, said his office had found nothing to indicate the likelihood of sabotage. Two men who watched the plane’s final few yards of flight, said its engines were failing and one had even quit. E. J. Rice who was close enough to feel the heat of the flames when the plane’s heavily loaded gas tanks exploded with dreadful results said the engines were “poppin’ and sputtering.” Herbert Gardiner said one of the engines sounded flat and no exhaust was visible from another. Fred Hall, copilot from Miami, agreed one engine had given trouble "right after the takeoff.” But he said, “the other three engines were functioning perfectly. That's enough to get that type of plane up without too much trouble." He couldn’t say, though, why the plane began to settle in a matter of seconds after the takeoff instead of gaining the altitude it needed so badly to clear the hill south of the runway.


VETTER: DONALD Vetter/A2C US Air Force/Korea/1932-1977


WELSCH: EDWARD H PVT ARMY 20 SEP. 1950 KILLED IN ACTION 1932 Private Welsch was a member of the 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. He was Killed in Action while fighting the enemy in South Korea on September 20, 1950.


WIER: GEORGE W. Wier/Pfc. US Army/Korea/Feb. 22, 1932-Dec. 28, 1978


ZAHORIK: LEONARD F., Wisconsin, SFC 27 Inf. 25 Inf. Div. Korea PH


ZIPPERER: CLARENCE J. Zipperer/PFC U.S. Army/Korea/Mar. 22, 1927 - Jul. 27, 1981