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A.J. PACKARD A.J. Packard is down with an attack of the grip. Jan. 25, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


CHARLES PACKARD John P. Christmann of Eaton has brought suit against Charles Packard of the same town for shooting two of his horses. The men are neighbors and Christmann's horses were trespassing upon Packard's farm. The horses were found with gunshot wounds in their legs and Packard is charged with having done the deed. The case will be heard before Judge Craite on the 13th of next month. 29 June 1899, Manitowoc Pilot


EDWIN W. PACKARD A boiler in his mill exploded and he flew 200 feet. He bought a new boiler 13 Oct 1855, and sold the mill 08 Mar 1856. 06 Oct 1855, Manitowoc Herald


MARY PACKARD "Home, Sweet Home." news: Miss Mary Packard is the successful teacher of he Saxonburg school. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 27, 1881 P. 1 ******** Misses Delle Shove, Annie Heinemann and Mary Packard who wield the birch over unruly pupils in Kewaunee are spending their holidays with their relatives in this city. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, December 23, 1884 P.3


MAY PACKARD Miss May Packard of this city led all the teachers in Kewaunee Co. at the recent examination. Her average standing was 91. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 1, 1885 P.5


EMMA PAETZ A special dispensation has been granted for the marriage of Miss Emma Paetz of this city and Conrad Meinke of Milwaukee. The wedding was celebrated today. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, August 22, 1903 P. 4


MR. C. PAHLKOETTER A calf having six fully developed legs was born on the farm of Chas. Goessel of Gibson last week and lived three days. The calf was like other calves except that it had four hind legs, two of them being the reverse of the natural shape. Mr. Goessel tried to raise the calf but it did not seem to care to go through life on six legs. It was brought to Two Rivers and Mr. C. Pahlkoetter of that city, a skilled taxidermist, will stuff its skin. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, April 3, 1901, p. 1


MRS. C. PAHLKOETTER Monday evening, as Mrs. C. Pahlkoetter was on her way back from the cemetery to the home of her daughter, Mrs. L. Roebel, she suffered a stroke and is still in serious condition. 04 Oct. 1906, Der Nord Westen


MARTIN PAIDER Zander news: The following farmers from around Zander have purchased new cars: Knut Knudson, a Reo; Anton Valenta, a Ford; Jos. Yanda and Martin Paider, each an Oakland, and Krema brothers, each a Jeffry; Louis Kotche, a Pullman. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, April 27, 1916 P.4


DR. PAINE Dr. Paine's residence is now about completed and is an ornament to our city. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 4, 1881 P.1


DR. PAINE Dr. Paine lost a valuable horse by death on Friday inst. A hard drive and unavoidable exposure was the cause. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 10, 1885 P.3


JANE PALMITER Married Torrey - Palmiter - In Montpelier, Kewaunee county; on June 2d, 1875, by A. J. Wheatley, Esq., Mr. Samuel Torrey (son of E.N. Torrey) to Miss Jane Palmiter, both of Gibson, Manitowoc county, Wis. The young people have hosts of friends who unite in wishing that their wedded life may be long and pleasant Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), June 8, 1875 (NOTE: I put them in because they were both from Manitowoc county, apparently they lived and died in another county, possibly Kewaunee because they aren't in any cems. in Manitowoc co.)


CHRISTOPHER PANE In Probate. State of Wisconsin, Manitowoc County: SS In the matter of the last will and testament of Christopher Pane. On reading and filing an instrument in writing purporting to be the last will and testament of Christopher Pane, Sen, late of the town of Schleswig Manitowoc County, Wis., deceased, and also the petition of Christorpher Pane of the town of ________in the county of Manitowoc, and State of Wisconsin, representing, among other things, that the said Christopher Pane Sen. lately died in the county of Manitowoc State of Wisconsin, that said instrument is the last will and testment of said deceased, and praying that the said petitioner be appointed executor of said last will and testament, and that a day be appointed for hearing the proof of said last will and testament. It is ordered, That said application be heard before me, at my office, in the village of Manitowoc, on the 26 day of December AD 1859 at 10 o'clock AM, And it is further ordered; That notice of said appliction and hearing be given by publishing a copy of this order for three successive weeks, once in each week, in the Manitowoc Herald a newspaper printed in said County prior to said hearing. Charles H. Walker, County Judge, Dated Dec. 1 1859 Manitowoc Herald, Wednesday, December 7, 1859 P.2


CARL PANGBURN Carl Pangburn last week went off on a vacation leaving his barber shop in charge of a "hired man." The latter shut up shop and skipped the city. Manitowoc Pilot, Thursday, August 21, 1884


ANNA PANKRATZ The marriage of Frank Sweidinger to Miss Anna Pankratz will be solemnized June 19. The bride is a daughter of M. Pankratz. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, June 7, 1900 P. 2


GEORGE PANKRATZ Mr. George Pankratz has returned from his trip to Menominee, Wis., where he has bought some logs. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 10, 1882 P. 1


MRS. I. PANKRATZ Branch news: Mrs. Wm. Eatough visited last week with her daughter, Mrs. I. Pankratz, of Francis Creek. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, June 1, 1886 P.1


IGNATZ PANKRATZ Branch news: Mr. Ignatz Pankratz registered at the hotel of William Eatough last Friday. He was on his way to Francis Creek, having been called there by the death of his step-father, Mr. Feil. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, May 29, 1883 P.4


L.M. PANKRATZ "Kaiser" L.M. Pankratz celebrates his birthday with St. Patrick, and friends who assembled to extend greetings to him today at a York street emporum, presented him with a large bouquet in which there was much green among the roses. The presentation was made by Baron J.S.S while Lord Marshal J.W.K. officiated as master of ceremony. Consul J.S. carried the bouquet with Gov. A.J.L and diplomat L.C.S. as body guard. Mr. Pankratz confesses to 57 years and his friends expressed the hope that they might be "among those present" for fifty-seven more St. Patrick days. Mar. 17, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MR. & MRS. PANKRATZ Kellnersville news: Mrs. John Kellner was visiting her parents Mr. and Mrs. Pankratz, of Manitowoc, last week. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 21, 1882 P. 10


MICHAEL PANKRATZ COUPLE 30 YEARS WEDDED. Michael Pankratz and Wife Celebrate Day With Aid of Friends. Thirieth anniversary of the day on which they pledged their marriage vows was quietly celebrated by Mr. and Mrs. Michael Pankratz at the Washington street home of the couple Saturday, friends assisting in the happy occasion during the evening. The gathering was of informal character and neighbors and friends showered congratulations on the worthy pair whose matrimonial bark has sailed life's sea with fair weather to brighten the journey through all the years. Mr. Pankratz is engaged in the mercantile business and is one of the best known merchants of the city, whose store is at Washington and Twentieth street. The couple have resided here a long term of years and a large circle of friends will untie in the hope that many more years of happiness may bless their union. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, June 20, 1904 P. 1 ******** Mrs. Frank Sweitinger and children of Cleveland Ohio, are in the city guests at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Pankratz. Mrs. Sweitinger is a daughter of the latter. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, June 21, 1904 P. 6


MICHAEL PANKRATZ Michael Pankratz celebrated his 50th birthday last Friday. 23 Dec. 1897, Der Nord Westen


JOHN PANOCK Kellnersville news: John Panock has remved from Buffalo to his farm here which he purchased from Simon Hinek. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 24, 1885 P.3


ANTON PANOSH M.J. Panosh is in the city from Wabeno to spend a few days with his brother, Anton Panosh. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, April 29, 1916 P.2


JOSEPH PANOSH MARIBEL MAN BORN UNDER A LUCKY STAR—HAD $4,000, LOST IT AND THEN GOT IT BACK AGAIN John DeWane, a Maribel man, must have been born under a lucky star. First he carried $4,000 about with him and then when he lost the purse with its contents, he was fortunate enough to have the receptacle fall into honest hands and have it returned to him. Mr. DeWane was in the city Tuesday on business and while at the Addison House waiting for his train, purchased a paper from a Herald newsboy. He paid for the paper from a purse in which there was $75 cash and a note for $4,000. During the transaction DeWane heard his train pull in and hurriedly leaving the Addison House he left the purse on a table. The attention of Joseph Panosh, clerk at the hotel, was attracted when a stranger started to pick up the purse and Panosh headed off the move by taking charge of the pocketbook himself. Discovery of the loss was not made by Mr. DeWane until his train was well underway to Maribel but he had the conductor stop and let him off and he hiked back to the city to make search for his missing wallet, which was returned by Mr. Panosh when the Maribel man proved his property. Panosh was rewarded. Feb. 11, 1915, Manitowoc Daily Herald


WENCEL PANOSH STEPHANI, POP MAN, SELLS OUT HIS BUSINESS Charles Stephani, who for twenty-five years has been engaged in manufacture of pop and soft beverages with a plant on Franklin street, has disposed of the business and will retire. Mr. Stephani has sold the business to Wencel Panosh, who has been in employ of the plant for seven years and who will continue the business. The plant is one of the old established ones of its line and Mr. Stephani has been identified in the manufacture of products for fifty years though owner of the plant only the past 25 years. Mr. Stephani sold the property building and land several months ago to George Kunz. Manitowoc Herald News |Friday, February 10, 1928 | Page 1


G.W. PAPE Mr. G.W. Pape of Marshfield, has moved his famiy back to Manitowoc and will continue to reside here. Apr. 18, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


J.T. PAPE Reedsville news: J.T. Pape and Joseph Dumass have formed a partnership and purchased the Rusch saw mill in which they have put a new large planer and matcher, which they claim will do as good work as any in the county. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, June 9, 1885 P.3


HERMANN PAPER (corresp. in Lark 02 Feb) There was a terrible accident on Wed. of last week involving Hermann Paper in West Cooperstown. He was working with the chaff cutting machine and saw a playing child get dangerously close. Mr. Paper reached out with his left hand and pushed the child back, but in so doing his own right hand went into the machine. His hand was cut off at the wrist and the bones of the forearm so shattered that his arm will have to be amputated at the elbow. The severly wounded man was taken to the hospital in Green Bay where he is under medical attention. 03 Feb. 1898, Der Nord Westen


MRS. J. PARSONS Mrs. J. Parsons of Rochester, N.Y., is in the city a guest of her brother. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, August 4, 1904 P. 2


A.J. PATCHEN Business card: DENTISTRY: Dr. A.J. PATCHEN. Dentist Office in Sherman's Brick Block, Eighth street, Manitowoc, Wisconsin. Particular attention given to all different branches of the profession, and all work warranted. Teeth extracted without pain. Manitowoc Pilot, Jan. 4, 1870


A.J. PATCHEN, SON OF SEVERE ACCIDENT. A little son of Dr. A.J. Patchen was severely injured last evening by being thrown from a horse. He fell striking on his head making a severe wound and has been unconscious all night, but this morning is sensible and shows favorable symptoms. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, May 26, 1885 P.4


IDA PATCHEN The concert last Friday, at the Turner Hall, given by Miss Arietta Barrie, assisted by her two young sisters and Miss Ida Patchen at the piano, was one of the pleasantest entertainments we have witnessed lately. The singing throughout was very good, almost too artistic sometimes to be natural, and the accompaniments and solo pieces performed on the piano were really perfect and showed a degree of study and practice seldom witnessed in an amateur piano player. The House was well filled with an intelligent and highly pleased audience and we sincerely hope, that the material success of Miss Barrie was as satisfactory to her as her artistic success was to the appreciating audience. Manitowoc Tribune, Mar. 21, 1872 ************ Miss Ida Patchen presided at the organ in the Presbyterian church, Sunday. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 23, 1886 P.2


LOUIS N. PATNODE Although the Williams House has changed hands Louis N. Patnode the present popular and efficient clerk will remain in his old position. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 18, 1884 P.3


MRS. B. PATNODE Two Rivers news: Mrs. B. Patnode and her daughters, Mary and Bridge returned from quite an extended visit to friends in Cato last Wednesday, Miss Mary who taught the Goedjen district school the past year, will again take charge of the same the coming year. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, August 11, 1885 P.3


MARY PATNODE Niles news: Mr. L. Patnode, of Manitowoc, has been the guest, of his cousin, Mary Patnode the last week. Mr. Patnode is the kind of young men that are always welcomed, by the Niles folks. And especially the young ladies. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 28, 1882 P. 4


JAMES PATTERSON (NOTE: I have put the list in alphabetical order with surnames first to facilitate finding a certain surname) Old Settlers Club. At a meeting held pursuant to a notice published in the Manitowoc Pilot, Manitowoc County Chronicle, and the Nord-Western, at the Windiate House in the city of Manitowoc, on the 16th day of January A. D. 1879, for the purpose of organizing an Old Settlers Club, P. P. Smith was chosen chairman of the meeting and William Bach Secretary. Mr. Markham addressed the meeting and stated the object. On motion of Chas. W. White it was resolved to appoint a committee of three, to draft a Constitution and By-Laws for said club and to confer with the commitee, appointed by a meeting held at Klingholtz hall, January 4th, for the same purpose, for consolidation both clubs. H. H. Smith, W. W. Waldo, and William Bach were appointed as such committee. On motion of J. S. Anderson it was resolved to consider all present members of the club, and to instruct the Secretary to take their names down with date and year of arrival in this country. The following are the names and dates as recorded by the Secretary: Anderson, James S. - 1852 Bach, Wm. - April 1848 Bock, Chas. - June 1852 Burmeister, W. - May 1844 Cooper, Geo. - May 1855 Edwards, Henry - 1837 Fellows, M. - Sept. 1848 Hall, John - March 1851 Hall, Sam. - 1851 Hubbard, H. - April 1837 Jones, A. D. - June 1837 Klingholz, R. - July 1847 Kostomlastky, F. - July 1857 Lennox, Jos. - 1839 Markham, J. D. - May 1856 Miller, J. - 1856 Mulholland, H. - 1852 Mulholland, P. - May 1850 Noble, W. H. - May 1855 O'Shea, P. - 1853 Patterson, James - Aug. 1848 Ross, Norris - 1841 Seeger, L. - May 1850 Sherman, E. - Spring 1850 Smith, Ave - April 1844 Trummel, F. - May 1844 Tyler, M. - July 1854 Waldo, W. W. - May 1850 White, Chr. W. - 1852 Windiate, Thos. - Nov 1854 Wood, S. A. - Oct. 1849 On motion of J. D. Markham it was resolved to appoint a committee of arrangements and to have a social of the 21st day of February next, the following were so appointed: H. H. Smith, Chas. Esslinger, A. Wittmann, Lyman Emerson, H. S. Pierpont, H. Edwards. On motion of Chas. W. White it was resolved to meet again on the 15th day of Feb. next at 7 o’clock P. M. at the same place to hear the reports of committee. On motion of J. S. Anderson it was resolved to instruct the Secretary of the meeting to publish the proceedings in the newspapers of the County. On motion of J. D. Markham the meeting adjourned till the 15th day of Feb., 1879 at 7 o’clock P. M. at the same place. William Bach, Secretary Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), Jan. 21, 1879


E.C. PATZER A large delegation of over thirty people from this city attended the Two Rivers junior prom at Two Rivers last night, a special car returning from that city at one o'clock. Most of the young people who made the journey were local high school students. E.C. Patzer and Miss Rose Glander gave a demonstration of modern and fancy dancing during an intermission, which was very favorably received. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, May 20, 1916 P.2


MARTHA PAULIN WEDDING A QUIET AFFAIR. Announcement of Marriage Somewhat of a Surprise to Friends Quietly, and somewhat of a surprise to friends, Mrs. Martha Paulin, of this city, was wedded today to Dr. Ival Hanson, of Chicago, the ceremony taking place at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Torrison, N. Eighth street only members of the family being in attendance. Rev. P.E. Thorsen officiated and Dr. and Mrs. Hanson departed at once for Chicago to make their home. The bride is a sister to Mrs. Thomas Torrison and has made her home, in this city, residing on Huron street. She is well known to a large circle of friends who will extend congratulations. Dr. Hanson is located in Chicago where he has an extensive practice. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, July 26, 1904 P. 1 ******** (Note: The bride may be Martha Tostensen who married James Paulin. The marriage is in the marriage section)


J.E. PAULSON J.E. Paulson was in town from Oslo Friday. Mr. Paulson has made a record in the raising of cabbage this season, some of the heads weighing as high as 24 pounds. He has recently returned from a trip to Duluth, where he disposed of 17 tons of the product, receiving a fair price and being well satisfied that there is good money in the cabbage business. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, Nov. 25, 1899 P.2


CARL H. PAULUS Carl H. Paulus celebrated his 60th birthday here Fri. with friends. 25 May 1899, Der Nord Westen


CLARA PAULUS Friends assisted Miss Clara Paulus in celebrating her birthday at her home on Marshal street yesterday. Games were played, music rendered, refreshments served and the affair was very enjoyable. Those present were Misses Paula Tegen, Anna Meyer, Ruby Melendy, Margaret Meyer, Annette Oberland. Mar. 8, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MRS. WALTER PAULUS William Hess of Green Bay is in the city for a visit with his daughter, Mrs. Walter Paulus. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, April 12, 1916 P.1


MRS. WILLIAM PAULY Mrs. William Pauly departed for Watertown this morning where she will visit her parents for a few days. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, May 22, 1916 P.3


MRS. FRANK PAUS In falling backward from the seat of a wagon to the ground, Mrs. Frank Paus, of French Creek, was severly hurt by having the right collarbone fractured. The accident happened several days ago. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, October 30, 1903 P.1


HERMAN PAUTZ An accident involving a horse and wagon on Tues. in which Herman Pautz of Gibson was injured. 14 Nov. 1889, Der Nord Westen


MISS ROBERTA PEAY Miss Roberta Peay has returned from Chester, S.C., where she attended the funeral of her mother, who died recently. Manitowoc Herald Times, Friday, May 11, 1934 P.2


JERRY PECH Melnik-Brockville news: Frank Hostak sold his 40-acre farm to Math. Havlovetz from Larrabee, consideration $7,000. Mr. Hostak has again purchsed a lot from Jerry Pech on which he will have a house erected and lead a retired life. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, June 8, 1916 P.2


JOHN PECHER E.A. Hartman was here from Madison to spend Sunday, accompanied by his friend John Pecher, of that city. Mr. Pecher is a well known business man of the Capital city and the son-in-law of the late Mayor Hogan, whose death occurred very recently. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, October 5, 1903 P. 2


MR. PECK Gibson news: Mr. Peck is having a fine porch added to his house which will improve the looks greatly. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, June 29, 1886 P.3


MARY PECK Clarks Mills news: Mrs. Mary Peck has returned to Manitowoc after spending a few days with her daughter, Mrs. Frank Pieschel. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, March 18, 1916 P.5


E. PELKEY (From the correspondent in Mishicott, 11 Apr.) Mr. F. Rouiller has bought the farm of Mr. E. Pelkey for $10,000 and will soon settle on it with his family. Mr. Pelkey will move to Oconto where one of his brothers lives. 13 Apr. 1905, Der Nord Westen


GEORGE PELIET George Peliet of Atlantic, Iowa, is visiting his father-Mr. Jason Pellet. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 24, 1885 P.3


AMBROSE PELLET Mr. Ambrose Pellet formerly of Gibson but now of Atlantic City, Iowa, has been visiting relatives in our county. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, November 3, 1885 P.4


JASON PELLET Gibson news: Mr. Jason Pellet, has returned from Iowa. He contemplates selling his farm here and removing to that state. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, April 13, 1886 P.2


LOUIS PENTZIEN, MR. AND MRS. Mr.and Mrs. Louis Pentzien have returned to their home at Dubuque, Ia., after spending some time visiting relatives at their former homes here. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, May 9, 1916 P.3


GEORGE PEOT TWO RIVERS MAN POSSESSES A RARE OLD COIN, USED BY THE ROMANS BEFORE TIME OF CHRIST George Peot of Two Rivers, recently came into possession of a coin that is probably one of the rarest and oldest on record and it was coined by the Romans before Christ says the Chronicle of that city. Mr. Peot took the coin to John Braun, the jeweler, who examined and tested it. Mr. Braun is not an expert on coins but is of the opinion that the coin is a valuable one. The coin is made of a composition of metals and is about 20 per cent gold and contains some copper. On one side it has a design with Roman lettering showing the value of the same and the other side contains a likeness of a man and an ass which is crudely shaped and designed. The coin was found by some boys and purchased from them by Mr. Peot. It will be sent to an expert in New York for examination. It may be quite valuable. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, May 19, 1915, Page 5


JOHN PEPPARD St. Nazians news (sic): John Peppard is preparing to build a new house this summer. His brother Daniel will do the work. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, May 26, 1885 P.4


JOHN PEPPARD, MRS. St. Nazianz news: Mrs. John Peppard Sen., of Meeme in (sic) visiting relatives at Chicago. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, May 12, 1885 P.4


THOMAS PEPPARD St. Nazians news (sic): Denis Nagel has rented his farm to Thomas Peppard for four years at $400 per year. Thos. Finch has also rented his farm to Fred Lutzke. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, May 26, 1885 P.4


FRED PERCE Rapids News: Mrs. Chas. Windus and children, who were visiting at the Fred Perce home, left for Portage Tuesday. After a few days' visit there, they will continue their journey to Pittsburgh where they will make their future home. Feb. 5, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


WENZEL PEROUTKA From a fall, Wenzel Peroutka, a resident of Francis Creek, recently punctured his knee with a nail. It is too early to tell whether the wound shows evidence of blood poisoning, and the worst case is feared. 12 Jan. 1905, Der Nord Westen


JOSEPH PERRY A Daring and Noble Act-A Man saved from drowning. On Wednesday afternoon a Norwegian named Lars Olson fell from off the end of the North Pier, unperceived, and was going down the second time when Mr. Joseph Perry nobly jumped in after him. The water was some twenty feet deep, and the sea very high at the time, but Mr. Perry, at the risk of his own life, nobly saved the unfortunate man from a watery grave. As it was, Mr. P. had a narrow escape, and it was with great difficulty that he rescued the drowning man, as well as saved his own life. Such a noble and gallant act deserves more praise than all the feats of Blondin or Blitz. Manitowoc Pilot, Friday, September 23, 1859 P.3


LEONA PERRY GIRL SUFFERS BROKEN JAW AS TWO CARS MEET Miss Leona Perry Injured in Automobile Accident on Forrest Avenue Last Night In a head on collision on Forrest Ave., between Twenty-fifth and Twenty-sixth street shortly after midnight last night, Miss Leona Perry, a south side girl and a passenger in one of the machines was quite badly injured suffering a broken jaw and severe cuts and lacerations about the face and neck when she was thrown up against the windshield and was cut by flying glass. Rushed to a physician's office after the crash it was found that Miss Perry had a close call, when her jugular vein was nearly severed by a piece of flying glass. Her wounds were dressed and she was removed to her home, and unless complications set in it is probable that she will pull through. The accident resulted when the Chevrolet coach owned by Roy Rebmann and driven by George Richmann collided with the Chevrolet touring car owned and driven by Hugo Hoffmann, residing on Route 2, Two Rivers, near Mishicot. The Rebmann car was bound in from the north and was proceeding down Forrest Ave. In addition to Roy Rebmann and Richman, Miss Rachel Lieberger and Leona Perry were passengers in the machine. Meet in Center of Street. They reported that they noticed the Hoffman machine proceeding north along Forrest Ave., and declared that it was hugging the east side of the highway. Richman declared that he swung out to the left in order to clear the oncoming machine, but at about the same time Hoffmann also swerved out towards the middle of the street. The result was a head on smash in the center of the street. Of the four person in the Rebmann car and Hoffmann and his companion in the other machine, Miss Perry was the only one seriously hurt. Manitowoc Herald News, Monday, August 13, 1928 Page 11


BESSIE PETERIK Miss Bessie Peterik, who is making her home in Chicago, is here for a holiday visit with her mother. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, December 28, 1903 P. 1


DONALD PETERICK Donald, the two year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Peterick, North 8th street, suffered a painful injury this morning when he crushed his right thumb in an electric washing machine. Manitowoc Herald News, Saturday, December 9, 1922 p.3


JOHN PETERIK CRIME ON INCREASE Municipal Court Kept Busy Hearing Criminal Actions. ASSAULT CASES IN MAJORITY. One of the Worst Yet Tried to Come up Tomorrow-Ulness Bound Over on Criminal Charge-Other Cases. John Peterik and Eli Johnson were arrested on assault and battery charges. Johnson pleaded guilty and paid a fine and costs amounting to $4.50 in court this afternoon. Peterik's case will be heard late today. The warrants were issued on complaint of James. W. Pech. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, May 20, 1903 P. 1


JOHN PETERIK John Peterik will re-open the Hotel Aberdeen July 1. The place has been closed since the death of his father. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, June 22, 1904 P. 2


LEWIS PETERIK, MR. AND MRS. Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Peterik have returned to Milwaukee after spending a few days here with friends and relatives. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, May 8, 1916 P.3


L. PETERMICHEL L. Petermichel who was sentenced to jail for six months, made his escape this morning. While assisting in the work around the jail, he managed to elude the vigilance of the jailor and went away without taking a formal leave. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, July 6, 1886 P.3


CHARLES AND JOHN PETERS TWO PETERS BOYS WOUNDED IN FRANCE, BOTH ON ROAD TO RECOVERY, WRITE LETTERS HOME Letters received from Corporal John Peters of Company H. 127th infantry, who left with Company H, indicate that he was wounded in action in France on July 10th and has been in a base hospital ever since. He was shot through the thigh. Charles Peters, his brother, and a private in the same company who also left here with company H was also wounded in the same battle, but his injuries were slight. Both boys in their letters tell of having the Boche on the run one letter saying, “women and kids are their meat and when it comes to a good hard boiled yank they are not in it.” Corporal Peters said one Yank can make three or four Germans hunt their hole. He adds that “we will eat our Christmas dinner on the banks of the Rhine.” Charles Peters in telling of being wounded says he was struck on the shoulder blade by a machine gun and walked three miles to get to the ambulance. He was fighting near Chateau Thierry when wounded. He says the Sammies all imagined that they would be excited when they got into battle, but Peters said he was as steady as when on the rifle range. He also announces that Walter Bedford was wounded in the foot. Oct. 10, 1918, Manitowoc Herald News


MISS A. PETERSON Larabee news: The many friends of Miss A. Peterson will be pleased to learn that she has almost wholly recovered from her mental alienation, and that she will return to her home in Gibson in a short time. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 7, 1882 P.4


GUSTAVE PETERSON Gustave Peterson of Chicago is spending his vacation in this city visiting relatives and friends. He is a former resident of Manitowoc having left here sixteen years ago. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, July 23, 1904 P. 4


HALVOR PETERSON Last Fri., farmer Halvor Peterson, resident in Oslo, had the misfortune to catch his left hand in the chaff cutter, so injuring it that Dr. Kemper had to amputate the arm between the wrist and the elbow. 13 Feb. 1896, Der Nord Westen


MARTIN PETERSON Martin Peterson, who was hurt on the schooner Thos. Howland, while at East Saginaw, has just been able to return to his home in this city. Oct. 21, 1898, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MAY PETERSON Miss May Peterson arrived last evening from Milwaukee, where she has been taking a course preparing herself for a trained nurse. She has been ill and has come home to recuperate. Jan. 27, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MRS. OLE PETERSON News has been received by friends here of the death of Mrs. P.R. Hefferman, of Rib Lake. Mrs. Hefferman was formerly a resident of Tisch Mills, this county and a daughter of the late Mrs. Ole Peterson demise occurred only a few days preceeding that of the daughter. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, October 24, 1903 P. 3


P. PETRUSKI Two Rivers news: On Tuesday of last week, P. Petruski a farmer who lives a few miles north of here and J. Schmokler a railroad employee at Manitowoc, who were on their way to the latter place created considerable excitement in this city. They stopped at the Washington House and the landlord perceiving that they wanted to make a disturbance, ordered them out. Somewhat enraged, they left and entered a neighboring hostelry and got pretty well under the influence of "fire water." Schmokler began to scuffle about the room with Ed. Stolberg, and finally it grew serious and Stolberg struck him above one of the eyes inflicting quite a gash. Stolberg not wanting to have anything more to do with the fellow, immediately took his leave, Schmokler being armed with a revolver fired two shots at hap hazzard, but it is suspected with the intention of shooting Stolberg. Petruski and Schmokler were arrested and charged $7 and $13 respectively besides enjoying a nights lodging in the "lock up." Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, Aug. 11, 1885 P.3


ALBERT PETSKA Rosecrans news: Albert Petska lost his lower limbs while engaged in a battle at Chateau Thierry in France in August in 1918. He can tell some terrible stories about warfare. Manitowoc Herald News, Saturday, Jan. 4, 1919 P.2


JOHN PEZAR SOLDIER BOY IS HOME John Pezar, Serving With U.S. Regulars, Here on Furlough John Pezar, a Manitowoc boy who is serving with the Regulars in the United States army, is here on a furlough, having arrived Saturday night and will spend the holidays with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Pezar, South Twelfth street. Pezar is a member of the Twenty-Second regiment, artillery and is stationed at Fort Sheridan. He enlisted two years ago and has not been home in twelve months before. He secured a furlough a few days ago for thirty days and will visit in the northern part of the state before rejoining his command. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, December 22, 1902, Page 1


FRANK PFEFFER Gills Corners news: Dan Brennan sold his saloon at Wayside to Frank Pfeffer for $3,200. Frank is now in possession. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, April 19, 1916 P.4


GEORGE PFEFFER George Pfeffer is home from Marquette college to spend the week end, arrving last night. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, June 3, 1916 P.2


MATHIAS PFEFFER PIONEER COUPLE CELEBRATES GOLDEN WEDDING HERE MIDST BLOSSOMS SENT FROM OREGON Midst the fragrance of blossoms grown at Salem, Ore., Mr. and Mrs. Mathias Pfeffer, pioneer residents of Manitowoc county, yesterday celebrated their golden wedding anniversary at their home at Taus. Fifty families, relatives, neighbors and friends gathered at the home to join in the celebration. Flowers used in the decoration of the home were sent from Salem, Ore., by a sister of Mrs. Pfeffer and each guest was presented with one of the roses. Mr. Pfeffer is confined to his bed by illness but was able to greet the guests. The wedding ceremony of fifty years ago at Marberg, Germany, was re-enacted, Frank Weber and Earl Pfeffer, grandsons of the couple and Emily Zahorik and Agnes Dvorak attending the couple. Mrs. Pfeffer is a sister of Max Behm of this city. A dinner was served and music, games and other entertainment was enjoyed by the guests. Among out of town guests present were Mrs. Eisenreigh and Mrs. Hornick of Seymour. May 18, 1915, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MR. PFISTER Two Creeks news: Mr. Pfister of Milwaukee, sold 160 acres of land that he owned in the town of Mishicott for $800, to Messrs Mange & Fisch of Kewaunee. The object of the purchasers is to cut away the timber and then again sell the land. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 27, 1881 P. 4


WM. F. PFLUEGER Philip Pflueger, of Chicago, and Henry Vits are visiting friends at Mishicott. Mr. Pflueger is the father of Wm. F. Pflueger of the Aluminum Novelty Co. June 1, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


FRED PFUNDER JR. Two Creeks news: Fred. Pfunder Jr. who has been visiting with some relatives at Chicago for the past four weeks has again returned home, and is now telling his many friends of the good time he had. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 27, 1881 P. 4


JAMES PHAIR James Phair (sic), superintendent of the Manitowoc and Northern Traction Co., is very ill at his home on Cleveland avenue. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, May 2, 1916 P.3


JOHN PHALEN John Phalen will remove his plumbing shop to the building corner Main and Washington streets. Apr. 8, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MRS. JOHN PHALEN Mrs. John Phalen is seriossly (sic) ill at her home on Franklin street. Mar. 9, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


FRED PHILLIPPEN Fred Phillippen is entertaining friends at his home on Division street to-day, in honor of his 75th birthday. Feb. 2, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


FRED PHILIPPEN Fred Philippen, a well-known resident who has lived here more than 50 yrs., celebrated his 84th birthday on Thurs. last week. 24 Dec. 1903, Der Nord Westen


FRIEDRICH PHILIPPEN Friedrich Philippen celebrated his 75th birthday last Thurs. 09 Feb. 1899, Der Nord Westen


MRS. FRED PHILLIPPEN Mrs. Fred Phillippen, one of the pioneer residents of the city, recieved (sic) the congratulations of many friends yesterday on the eighty-fourth anniversary of her birth. Mrs. Phillippen resides on the South Side. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, December 18, 1903 P. 1


FRITZ PHILIPPEN Congratulations to one of our old war buddies, Mr. Fritz Philippen, a resident of the 3rd Ward in Manitowoc, who celebrated his 66th birthday last Sun, 2 Feb. 06 Feb. 1890, Der Nord Westen


MRS. FRITZ PHILIPPEN Mrs. Fritz Philippen celebrated her 80th birthday on Sun. 21 Dec. 1899, Der Nord Westen


MR. PHILLIPS Edwards news: Mr. Phillips, of northern Michigan, brother of Assemlyman elect of this district, came to this place a week ago, to purchase horses to use in the lumber woods during the winter. Misses Gertrude and Mary Phillips returned with him to show the Michiganders what they can do in the culinary art. Prompt meals, savory dishes, and courteous waiters, are what we will vouch for in that lumber region this winter. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 22, 1881 P. 4


DAVID PHILLIPS On Monday morning,, the 12th inst., David Phillips, a young man employed in Smith's saw-mill at Two Rivers, while throwing a band off a wheel in the mill was drawn into the machinery, and before the engine could be stopped, both legs were broken, with three ribs, and one arm in several places. He was otherwise very much mangled. Dr. Ranche rendered every aid in his power, but it is feared that he will not survive. 22 Nov 1849, Green Bay Advocate


ERNST PFINGSTEN Mishicott news: Mr. Ernst Pfingsten has changed his horse for a team. Manitowoc Pilot, March 8, 1894


ELIZABETH PHIPPS Mrs. Elizabeth Phipps of this city, celebrated her 90th birthday this week, Wednesday and many friends called to pay their respects to the estimable lady. Mrs. Phipps is in excellent health and retains her faculties. Jan. 26, 1900, Manitowoc Daily Herald


ANTON PICHILL REPORT OF COUNTY JUDGE ON TUBERCULAR PATIENTS TO THE HONORABLE CHAIRMAN AND BOARD OF SUPERVISORS OF MANITOWOC COUNTY, WISCONSIN: Gentlemen: - in accordance with duties which are provided for in the Statutes, I beg leave to submit my report to all proceedings and hearings in relating to tubercular patients had and determined since filing of my last report, May 13, 1919, up to and including this 13th day of November, 1919. John Chloupek, County Judge, Anton Pichill, single, between 13 and 14 years of age, a resident of Town of Kossuth, Wisconsin, committed to Maple Crest Sanatorium on August 5th, 1919; J.M. Kelley examining physician.


PIENING, MISS The Misses Guttman and Piening have gone to Frankfort, Mich. to spend a few weeks at the home of the latter's sister. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, July 28, 1885 P.3


ADOLPH PIENING Adolph Piening Esq. has at last received notice of his appointment as Postmaster and will soon receive his commission and enter upon his duties. So far as the Republicans are concerned the appointment of Mr. Piening is satisfactory. Of course there are some of our Democratic brethren who think some one else might, could, would or should have been appointed had the claims of the staunch workers in that party been properly considered. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, July 14, 1885 P.2


ADOLPH PIENING The appointment of Adolph Piening as postmaster of this city was confirmed by the Senate on Wednesday last. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 19, 1886 P.3 ********** Adolph Piening celebrated his 62nd birthday yesterday with friends. 24 Dec. 1896, Der Nord Westen


R. PIEPER, PROFESSOR (PASTOR) Professor R. Pieper of Springfield, Illinois, has gone back after visiting here. For many years the professor was pastor of the local Lutheran Church and has many friends here… He was accompanied by his son, a theology student, and by his son-in-law, Pastor Sehrein. The latter filled the pulpit in the Lutheran Church last Sunday… 02 Aug. 1906, Der Nord Westen


FRED PIERCE Rapids news: Mrs. Stanley Pierce and children of Pittsburg are visiting at the Fred Pierce home. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, April 28, 1916 P.5 ******** Rapids news: Mrs. Stanley Pierce and children of Pittsburgh are spending the wek (sic) at the Fred Pierce home. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, May 26, 1916 P.3


H.S. PIERPONT, MRS. (From the correspondent in Two Rivers, 07 Oct.) Mrs. H.S. Pierpont, whose husband recently died, is going to Kansas City, Missouri with her daughter Jennie and plans to establish there. Her son is already there and has a high position with the St. Paul Railroad. 09 Oct. 1890, Der Nord Westen


H.S. PIERPONT (NOTE: I have put the list in alphabetical order with surnames first to facilitate finding a certain surname) Old Settlers Club. At a meeting held pursuant to a notice published in the Manitowoc Pilot, Manitowoc County Chronicle, and the Nord-Western, at the Windiate House in the city of Manitowoc, on the 16th day of January A. D. 1879, for the purpose of organizing an Old Settlers Club, P. P. Smith was chosen chairman of the meeting and William Bach Secretary. Mr. Markham addressed the meeting and stated the object. On motion of Chas. W. White it was resolved to appoint a committee of three, to draft a Constitution and By-Laws for said club and to confer with the commitee, appointed by a meeting held at Klingholtz hall, January 4th, for the same purpose, for consolidation both clubs. H. H. Smith, W. W. Waldo, and William Bach were appointed as such committee. On motion of J. S. Anderson it was resolved to consider all present members of the club, and to instruct the Secretary to take their names down with date and year of arrival in this country. The following are the names and dates as recorded by the Secretary: Anderson, James S. - 1852 Bach, Wm. - April 1848 Bock, Chas. - June 1852 Burmeister, W. - May 1844 Cooper, Geo. - May 1855 Edwards, Henry - 1837 Fellows, M. - Sept. 1848 Hall, John - March 1851 Hall, Sam. - 1851 Hubbard, H. - April 1837 Jones, A. D. - June 1837 Klingholz, R. - July 1847 Kostomlastky, F. - July 1857 Lennox, Jos. - 1839 Markham, J. D. - May 1856 Miller, J. - 1856 Mulholland, H. - 1852 Mulholland, P. - May 1850 Noble, W. H. - May 1855 O'Shea, P. - 1853 Patterson, James - Aug. 1848 Ross, Norris - 1841 Seeger, L. - May 1850 Sherman, E. - Spring 1850 Smith, Ave - April 1844 Trummel, F. - May 1844 Tyler, M. - July 1854 Waldo, W. W. - May 1850 White, Chr. W. - 1852 Windiate, Thos. - Nov 1854 Wood, S. A. - Oct. 1849 On motion of J. D. Markham it was resolved to appoint a committee of arrangements and to have a social of the 21st day of February next, the following were so appointed: H. H. Smith, Chas. Esslinger, A. Wittmann, Lyman Emerson, H. S. Pierpont, H. Edwards. On motion of Chas. W. White it was resolved to meet again on the 15th day of Feb. next at 7 o’clock P. M. at the same place to hear the reports of committee. On motion of J. S. Anderson it was resolved to instruct the Secretary of the meeting to publish the proceedings in the newspapers of the County. On motion of J. D. Markham the meeting adjourned till the 15th day of Feb., 1879 at 7 o’clock P. M. at the same place. William Bach, Secretary Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), Jan. 21, 1879


JULIA PIERPONT A Runaway Last Thursday a party from this village, consisting of Mrs. L. Mann, Miss Julia Pierpont, Miss Clara Whitcomb and a boy for a driver, went to Manitowoc for a ride. Just as they were entering that city the horses attached to their carriage were frightened at some object in the street, and became unmanageable dashing madly down Sixth-street in the direction of the river. The brave little fellow who did the driving, although unable to check the speed of the frightened animals, succeeded in reining them into a pile of corded wood just before they reached the river. Had he not done so they would have undoubtedly ran off the dock into the water, and all perhaps, would have drowned. As it was, however, when they came in contact with the pile of wood, the sudden stop smashed the carriage and threw the ladies violently out otherwise seriously injuring them. The party came home on an evening train, decorated with court-paster but in tolerable good spirits notwithstanding their mishap. Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), June 1, 1875


VICTOR PIERRELEE In Circuit court Tuesday afternoon Attorney Albert Schmidt presented the names of Victor Pierrelee(?) and Arnold Alexander for admittance to Manitowoc County bar, and the practice was favored. The young men are both graduates of the law school school of the University and have been recently established themselves here. They are destined to attain prominence in their chosen profession. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 1901, p. 2


ALBERT PIERSON QUICK ACTION BY YOUTH SAVES BOY FROM RIVER West Side Lad Rescued By Albert Pierson From River At Tenth Street Albert Pierson, fifteen year old son of Mr. and Mrs. William Pierson, 1114 Washington street saved Raymond Jagonsky(sic), nine year old west side boy from drowning in the river this morning at 11 o’clock near Tenth street bridge, when he pulled the boy out by the arm as he was sinking for the second time. Lad Falls From Boat. Young Jagodinsky and another small boy were playing about the Tuisl boat, at the south end of Tenth street bridge. In some manner he toppled off the end of the boat into the river. Just at that time young Pierson, in company with Lawrence Sheridan was coming to the dock in a small row boat. Seeing that something was wrong, young Pierson jumped up on the dock, over onto the fish boat and reaching over just as Jagodinsky rose to the surface grabbed the youth by the hand as he was sinking from sight. The lad was hauled up on the boat and although having swallowed considerable water was soon recovered sufficiently so that he could remove his clothing and dry his garments. Later he proceeded to his home. Manitowoc Herald News, Saturday, July 21, 1928 Page 4


PETER PIETROWSKI FIRE CAPTAIN IS BURNED BY LIVE STEAM In a fire in the blower system Monday afternoon at the plant of the Wisconsin Wood Products Co., Captain Peter Pietrowski had his face scalded by live steam, when the safety valve on the roof of the building let go while the captain and other firemen were at work extinguishing the blaze. One side of Pietrowski’s face was burned by the steam, but he was able to remain on duty, and expects to be all right in a couple of days. Fire in the sawdust in the big blower at the plant gave the firemen an hour’s work before it was controlled. The damage was small. Manitowoc Herald News, Tuesday, July 17, 1928 Page 11


ANNA PILGER Miss Anna Pilger of Sheboygan is visiting with her sister, Mrs. Carl Hanson. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, May 8, 1916 P.3


EDWARD G. PILGER Edward G. Pilger, a former Manitowoc boy, has returned to the city to locate and engage in the decorating business. Mr. Pilger has been employed at Milwaukee and Chicago and was one of the crew which decorated the new courthouse here. He has had years of experience. May 02, 1917, Manitowoc Daily Herald


JOSEPHINE PILGER Mrs. Josephine Pilger was pleasantly surprised at the home of Mr. and Mrs. A.W. Sporer, North Tenth street, yesterday in celebration of her 84th birthday anniversary. Friends and relatives made up the party which enjoyed a pleasant time at cards and other entertainment in which Mrs. Pilger joined. Mar. 20, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


RUBE PILON Rube Pilon, the Two Rivers base ball pitcher, has gone to Sulton, Wash., to make his home. Apr. 26, 1901, Manitowoc Daily Herald


OLIVE PILONG (Should be Pilon?) Oliver Pilong, a fisherman living in this village, had a brand new pound net torn to pieces by a passing vessel last Saturday. It is thought the captain of the vessel ran into the net from pure maliciousness as she could easily have avoided it had he wished to have done so. It is to be hoped that Mr. Pilong will succeed in obtaining damages from the captain, if the destruction of the net could have been avoided. Some of the captains of the pretty little crafts that sail up and down the shore think they are the lords of the lake, and the fishermen have no rights which are bound to respect, and it would be well for them to understand that they are liable for all damage done by their vessels, either through negligence of wantonness. Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), June 15, 1875


PHILIP PINGEL KEIL(sic) MAN NOT INSANE BUT WILL BE DETAINED Sheboygan Co. Holds Philip Pingle(sic) for Some Observation Philip Pingel, who was taken from his father's home between Kiel and Elkhart Lake about two weeks ago by Sheboygan county authorities, and later examined by physicians as to his sanity, is still at the county asylum awaiting dispostion by the officials. Pingel gave straight answers to everything the doctors asked and they were unwilling to recommend his commitment to the asylum on the evidence. He will probably be held until his record has been looked up further. He is said to be a man with an ungovernable temper and it is thought this may to some extent account for the alleged threats which caused him to be taken into custody. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, Mar. 17, 1916 P.1 ********* Phillip Pingel, the Kiel man who has been detained at the Sheboygan county hospital after examination in which physicians declared him to be sane, has been released and has returned to his home. Pingel created some excitement two weeks ago and was thought to be insane but physicians who examined him, said that his mind was not affected. Mar. 20, 1916 P.3, Manitowoc Daily Herald


ALONZO PIPER Cato news: Alonzo Piper formerly of this place but now an enterprising farmer of Kerwin, Kan. is spending the winter with his father J.T. Piper. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, December 8, 1885 P.4


PETER PITSCH Peter Pitsch, while unloading a car of wood at the Northwestern tracks yesterday, caught a ring which he was wearing on a projection of the car and tore the third finger of his left hand almost completely off, it being neccssary to amputate the digit. He resides on Green street. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, May 16, 1916 P.3


MRS. EDWARD PITTSLEY MEETS BROTHER SHE NEVER KNEW AT A FUNERAL Mrs. Edward Pittsley has returned from Neillsville where she attended the funeral of her brother, Peter Miller, who was stricken with heart failure while in his yard chopping wood a few days ago. While there Mrs. Pittsley met with her brother Peter of Rice Lake, Wis., whom to her knowledge she had never met before. Brothers and sisters had been separated when quite young, each of the children being adopted by a different family. Mrs. Pittsley was adopted by Mr. and Mrs. Lenox of this city who took her out of an orphan asylum in Milwaukee, and reared her as if she had been a child of their own. While at Neillsville Mrs. Pittsley also laerned (sic) of the existance of another brother who is now a resident of Alaska. Corespondence (sic) will ensue and a family reunion is contemplated which will naturally prove a happy event. Manitowoc Herald News, Friday, January 28, 1921 P.1


CHAS. PITZ John Kelley took his departure for Erie, Pa., this morning. Mr. Kelley will act as first mate of the steamer Manchester. He was accompanied by Chas. Pitz, who will serve on the same boat as wheelman. Apr. 15, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


CORRINE PITZ; MR. AND MRS. JOHN PITZ Miss Corrine Pitz has returned from a day's visit at Green Bay. She was accompanied by her sister, Mrs. G.W. Kennedy, who will spend a few days in the city with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Pitz, on York street. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, March 8, 1916 P.3


LAURA PITZ Teachers of the Third and Fifth Ward schools will be entertained at the home of Miss Laura Grossteuck this evening at a farewell by the Misses Grossteuck and Laura Pitz, who are soon to sever their relations as teachers to take up studies at the Presbyterian hospital in Chicago as trained nurses. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, June 18, 1904 P. 3


MR. PITZ City Engineer Pitz has returned from a visit of several months with his brother who lives in Plattsmouth, Nebraska, whom he hadn't seen in 14 years. 05 May 1904, Der Nord Westen


MRS. FRANCIS PITZ Mrs. Francis Pitz has returned to Green Bay after a visit in the city the past few days. Mrs. Pitz has disposed of her property here to local people. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, May 25, 1916 P.3


GEORGE PITZ George Reichert and George Pitz have departed for Cleveland where they will reship on one of the big steel boats from that port after spending the winter at home. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, April 19, 1916 P.3


HUGO PITZ Hugo Pitz, who has been attending college at Troy, N. Y., will arrive home this week for the summer vacation. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, June 17, 1901, p. 3


HUGO E. PITZ Hugo E. Pitz, son of our city engineer, has gone to Iowa where he will work for a short time with a firm of railroad engineers. Oct. 21, 1898, Manitowoc Daily Herald ******** Mr. Hugo Pitz who has been assisting a surveying party in Iowa returned to his home in this city to spend the winter. Dec. 10, 1898, Manitowoc Daily Herald ******** Hugo Pitz, son of City Engineer L.K. Pitz, has taken a position with the U. S. Engineers and will be working on the Mississippi at Memphis. 23 June 1904, Der Nord Westen


JOHN PITZ Branch news: John Pitz who left for Germany last August, intending to spend the winter there, and who was sent for on account of the illness of his wife is expected some time this week. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, Nov. 25, 1884 P.3 ******** Branch news: Mr. John Pitz, returned to this place last week after having spent six months with his parents in Germany. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 10, 1885 P.6 ******** Branch news: Mrs. Geo. Noble is the guest of her sister Mrs. John Pitz. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 29, 1885 P.3


JOHN PITZ A horse which had broken away from its owner created all kinds of havoc on York street yesterday afternoon. It dashed up the street at a jay-eye-see gait and ran into the yard at the home of John Pitz. With a desire to investigate into the mysteries of sausage making the animal started for the house, broke in the door and entered the hall, proceeded the entire length until it reached the door leading to the sausage room in the butcher's shop. At this point obstacles which could not be overcome were met with and after considerable trouble the animal was driven from the hall. A large crowd gathered about to witness the "fun" and such it proved to be. Apr. 10, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MRS. JOHN PITZ Branch news: Mrs. John Pitz left on Saturday, for a visit with her sister, Mrs. Noels of Appleton. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 17, 1885 P.2


JOS. PITZKA Jos. Pitzka, of the town of Kossuth, was fined one dollar and costs in Justice Byron's Court for using abusive language. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 27, 1881 P. 1


O.H. PLATT CHANGE OF FIRM The firm of Platt & Vilas is from and after this date changed to that of O.H. Platt & Co., consisting of O.H. Platt, Joseph Vilas Jr. and Gideon E. Collins. Manitowoc, Sept. 23d, 1858. O.H. PLATT & CO. Jan. 4, 1859 P. 3, The Daily Tribune


JOHN PLATTEN St. Nazians (sic) news: Otto Littenberger's new house on Main street is in an advanced stage of construction. John Platten of Liberty has also begun erecting a new dwelling. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, July 28, 1885 P.2


J.E. PLATT SIDE WALKS.-We have some excellent side walks in our village, but not all that our own personal convenience requires.-We wish walks to be extended along 7th and 8th streets, from York to Park streets, and as we have no property on these streets, we are safe in urging the village authorities to levy a sufficient tax for the purpose. -Will J.E. Platt and Judge Reed object? Though they would have to pay the greatest amount of the expense, whe hope they will not refuse, after knowing our wishes in the premises. Manitowoc Pilot, Friday, December 2, 1859 P.3


O.H. PLATT Having this day sold my Mercantile Business to Messrs, Collins & Co., consisting of ?.B. Collins, and Jacob Holverson, I retire from the name for the purpose of devoting my whole time to the settlement of my old business affairs, and all those who are indebted to me, or to whom I am indebted, will find me (for the present) at my office in the old stand. In retiring from the business, I would say to my old friends and customers that it is in the hands of reliable business men, and I wish them every success in the future. O.H. PLATT. Manitowoc, Jan. 2nd 1860 Jan. 3, 1860 P. 3, The Daily Tribune


CHARLES PLEUSS Fred Klusmeyer was arrested for assault and battery last week on complaint of Charles Pleuss. They are both residents of Manitowoc Rapids and the clash took place at Four Corners. Klusmeyer had purchased a windmill and its color induced Pleuss to make some facetious remarks concerning it which were resented by Klusmeyer to the extent of "pasting him one." He was fined $5 which with costs made the expense of the altercation to him $13.48. June 8, 1899, Manitowoc Pilot


ERNST PLEUSS Rapids news: Mr. Ernst Pleuss has built an addition to his house and otherwise improved his residence by a coat of paint. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, August 4, 1885 P.1


JOHN PLEUSS KICKED BY HORSE AND IS BADLY HURT John Pleuss Has Hole in Neck and in Head Victim of a peculiar accident while at work on his father's farm west of here, John Pleuss had a close call to death, but late reports are that the boy will survive. Young Pleuss was pulling stumps with a team and was kicked by one of the horses. The animal struck Pleuss in the neck, cutting a gash in the flesh and threw Pleuss to the ground, the lad having his head cut open, and his shoulder dislocated. He was unconscious when picked up but his injuries are less severe than at first thought. Sept. 02, 1915, Manitowoc Daily Herald


JOHN PLEUSS John Pleuss, the 15 year old son of Charles Pleuss, near Brown's Corners, had his leg severely cut by a cross cutsaw while helping his father rip a plank. It is not believed that the injury will prove permanent in its effects. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, June 17, 1915, Page 3


FRED PLOECKELMAN Fred Plocekelman, a Gibson man is in court today as defendant to two charges of assault and battery, the complaining witnesses being Ed. Wilson and Louis Gay. The three men were members of a threshing crew and Ploeckelman and Gay had trouble which Wilson sought to settle. The case is being heard by a jury with three attorneys appearing, Sedgwick, and Adolph Chloupek for the plaintiff and Craits for the defense. The hearing will be finished today. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, October 21, 1903 P. 2 ******** In Municipal court the jury hearing the Ploeckelman case Saturday evening returned a verdict holding the defendant guilty of the assault on Ed Wilson. An appeal of the case has been taken. This was the second action against Ploekelman, he having been discharged on the first count in the case brought by Louis Gay. All parties are residents of Gibson. The court's sentence in the last case was a fine of $10 and costs which amounted to a considerable sum, there having been a large number of witnesses. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, October 26, 1903 P. 2


FRANK PLOPPER The Colonial theatre, which was recently taken over by E.M. Carstens and is to be managed by Frank Plopper, is to re-open this evening, the house having been closed for several days while repairs and improvements were being made. Mr. Plopper announced today that the theatre would open every evening and would offer 5 reel feature daily, in addition to music which will be featured. Mar. 22, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


ANNA POH Anna Poh, the south side girl, who attempted suicide Thursday night by drinking carbolic acid, will recover, physicians pronouncing her to be out of danger. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, October 6, 1903 P. 1


ANNA POLHOLA Mrs. Anna Polhola was committed to the Northern hospital at Oshkosh today for treatment. It is said that the woman will recover. Jan. 24, 1917, Manitowoc Daily Herald


LOUIS POLIVKA Polifka's Corners news: Louis Polivka, a member of the White Star orchestra, played at Gibson Monday. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, May 1, 1916 P.2


MRS. GEORGE POLLARD VISIT HOME AFTER 17 YEARS Return of Former Teachers of County is Surprise to Family Arriving here unannounced after and absence of seventeen years, Mrs. Will O'Connor and Mrs. George Pollard, of Malmo Neb., surprised their sister Mrs. A.J. Clark Thursday. The two who are now guests at the Clark home, are natives of Maple Grove where their parents still reside. Seventeen years ago both were engaged in teaching school in the county, but, believing opportunities of the west to be great, departed for Nebraska where they made a home and later married. Mesdames O'Connor and Pollard have never returned here until the present time and their coming now as unheralded being planned as a surprise to the family. The reunion between the sisters was most happy and will be overshadowed only by the reuniting of children and parents. The ladies will remain for an extended visit in the county. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, August 12, 1904 P. 1


JOSEPH POLLEN Joseph Pollen, formerly of this city, of late employed on the U.S. steamer Dahlia, has accepted a position on a steamer bound for Europe and will leave for New York in a few days to complete arrangements. June 10, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


L. POPPER L. Popper, formerly of this city, now a prominent commission merchant of Milwaukee, was in town last week. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 18, 1881 P. 1


RICHARD PORTEN HIGH SCHOOL BOY LOSES FINGER IN SAW Rich. Porten, Aged 17 Injured at School Today. Richard Porten, a student of the high school while at work in the manual training department this afternoon had his hand caught in a circular saw which he was operating, and as a result of the accident the boy may lose one or more fingers. The middle finger of the right hand was almost completely severed and the three other fingers are badly cut and lacerated though it is believed they can be saved. The manual training department of school is located in the base- ment and the light is not good. On dark days it is necessary to use the artificial light and the faculty has feared that some accident might happen. Young Porten is a tuition student at the high school, being a Cato boy. He is 17 years of age. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, April 11, 1913 p.1 ********* PORTEN LAD MAY NOT LOSE FINGERS AFTER ALL Richard Porten the high school studen who had his hand caught in a circular saw at the school...... (rest too dark to read) Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, April 12, 1913 p.1


NATHAN PORTER Rapids news: Mr. Nathan Porter, an old settler of Eaton with his daughter Jennie spent a day with friends in this vicinity. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, May 12, 1885 P.4


JOHN POSPISEL Kossuth news: The schools in this town are about closing. The school in District Number Three taught by J.W. Fitzmaurice closed last Tuesday after a successful term. The school in Cizeks district taught by John Pospisel closed last week. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, June 29, 1886 P.3


FRED POST Fred Post, proprietor of the Hub met with an accident Monday sustaining a dislocation of the shoulder in falling on the icy walk. The injury is painful and serious. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, January 26, 1904 P. 4


PETER POTROFSKY Peter Potrofsky of Mishicott, lost a foot several days ago in a very painful accident. He wanted to take his threshing machine across a bridge with his steam engine, but the bridge broke and Potrofsky's foot was caught between the firebox and the bridge's broken rail. It took several minutes for him to free his foot and the result was that the hot firebox had totally roasted his foot. 10 Oct. 1889, Der Nord Westen


GEORGE POWELL Thos. Hindle of Mass. has been visiting with his father in law, Geo. Powell of Kossuth. Mr. Hindle formerly lived in this city. He returned East yesterday. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 17, 1885 P.2


GEORGE POWELL Mishicott news: Geo. Powell, Esq., has been very sick for several weeks. Lakeshore Times, May 29, 1888


C.L. POWERS C.L. Powers, formerly principal of the Two Rivers school and at present the enterprising editor of the West Bend Times, called on us Thursday, and requested that his paper be placed on our exchange list. With the greast of pleasure do we comply with his request. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 18, 1881 P. 1 ********* Two Rivers news: C.L. Powers, formerly principal of our city schools, and at present editor of the West Bend Times, visited his old friends and former pupils in this city on Friday last. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 18, 1881 P. 1


JOHN POWERS BUTTED IN ON PRIVATE DANCE, GETS 6 MONTHS John Powers, Peeved at Being told to Leave, Breaks Windows John Powers, a steam fitter, intruded himself upon a private dancing party at Blue Ribbon hall last night and when he was requested to leave, became peeved and wanted to fight. Later, when Powers encountered the promoter of the party downstairs he insisted upon trouble and was told to leave the place. Angered by what he considered the inhospitable treatment, Powers proceeded to start a litte party of his own and fired nine stones through the plate glass windows of the saloon, conducted by Meyer & Simmet. Two large windows, valued at over $75 were smashed. Powers evaded the police when the wagon was called but was later taken into custody and booked up. In court this morning he was convicted of malicious destruction of property and sentenced to six months hard labor. He is 43. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, May 5, 1916 P.5


THEO. PRELIN Mr. Theo. Prelin, one of Newton's oldest settlers, has bought a large farm near Wausau, where he will spend the remainder of his days. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 22, 1881 P. 1


GEORGE PRESTON Geo. Preston, of Kellnersville, has temporarily located in the city. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 28, 1882 P. 1


GEORGE PRESTON The west side of the new iron bridge on Washington street has just received an iron railing similar to that on the East side of the bridge, which greatly improves the looks of the bridge. The work was done by George Preston and bears evidence of his skill and taste.-Two Rivers Chronicle. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, Nov. 18, 1884 P.3


CHARLOTTE PRITCHARD Miss Charlotte Pritchard, of Janesville, arrived in the city Friday evening to accept a position as supervisor of drawing in the public schools. The Janesville Recorder says: "The position was unsolicited on the part of Miss Pritchard and is a compliment to her abilities in artistic lines". Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, Nov. 11, 1899 P.2


MRS. FRANK PRITCHARD Mrs. Frank Pritchard is here from Fond du Lac fo (sic) a few days visit with he (sic) parents. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, April 19, 1916 P.3


DR. & MRS. J.A. PRITCHARD Mrs. R.H. Hubbell and daughter, who have been visiting at the home of her parents, Dr. and Mrs. J.A. Pritchard, returned to Milwaukee. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, March 4, 1916 P.3


WILLIAM PRITCHARD Wm. Pritchard, a veteran farmer of Meeme, spent a portion of the past week in Manitowoc. While there calmly overseeing the political excitement he was sought for to become a candidate for the Assembly. Failing health, sufficient work, and the desire to abstain from participating in politics, all prompted him to keep aloof from legislative honors. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 1, 1881 P. 4


MARY PRIXIEUS Mary Prixieus, the Two Rivers girl who was injured by a fall from a street car a few days ago, has so far recovered as to be able to be removed to her home and no serious consequences are expected from the accident. It was at first feared that the girl would not recover, concussion of the brain having resulted. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, September 19, 1903 P. 1


EMIL PROCHASKA Emil Prochsaka, whom ill health prevented from attending the State University this year, spends his leisure time at Robinson and Hinrich's drug store. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 11, 1881 P. 1 ******** Emil Prochaska is again well enough to attend the State Univeesity (sic) and will leave for Madison to morrow morning. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 3, 1882 P. 1


ANTON PROCHAZKA HONOR TO WHOM HONOR IS DUE. Everything was going "merry as a marriage bell" in our office Friday. The editor was at this desk dreaming that there was'nt (sic) a single unpaid subscription on his list; the boys were sticking type with plenty of "copy" ahead of them; the foreman was whistling gayley over a handsome "job" he was running when suddenly, crack! slam! bang! and our faithful Gordon job press was an apparently hopeless ruin. It was a crisis. We looked the situation over and then did what every other sensible man would do in like circumstances-sent for Anton Prochazka. He shook his head sorrowfully but said he would do what he could. Tuesday he fitted us out, our press looks as well as ever and the foreman says, works better. Every bearing and joint is a "neat and workmanlike" as possible and we feel proud that Manitowoc has a workman so capable. It is owing to Mr. Prochazka's skill that we are able to go on with our jobs after so little delay and do them in so satisfactory a manner. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 16, 1884 P.3


DR. PROCHAZKA Cooperstown news: Dr. Prochazka has given up his practice here and left last week. He intends to start business in some larger place. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, June 1, 1886 P.1


JOSEPH PRATT Joseph Pratt, who has been visiting his daughter, Mrs. M.J. Auermiller, of this city, has returned to his home at Milwaukee. Mar. 20, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


J.F. PRITCHARD Two Manitowoc gentlemen have been added to the list of Wisconsin inventors. Among the recent patents granted are one to Dr. J.F. Pritchard of this city and H.H. Miller, of Chicago, on a traveling bag, and one to James Worthington, a machinist at the seating company, on a step hinge. Apr. 8, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MABEL PRITCHARD Miss Mabel Pritchard is home from Milwaukee to spend Sunday with her parents. Apr. 15, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


JULIUS PROCHAZKA Cadet Julius Prochazka writes that when his seniors want to haze him they compel him to spell his name inserting sir after every letter, thus: p-sir, r-sir, o-sir, c-sir etc. We propose that Nepomoc Ztrischewski be sent down to aid Cadet Prochazka. Just put this congressional district to its taps and it could send cadets whose names would put the entire Naval Academy to flight. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 20, 1885 P.3


ADOLINE PROELL (From the correspondent in St. Nazianz, 09 Oct.) Elderly Lorenz Stiefvater fell quite ill with peritonitis. His daughter, Mrs. Adoline Proell and her daughter Mrs. Geo. Vits of Manitowoc hastened to his bedside. He is expected to get better. 11 Oct. 1906, Der Nord Westen


MRS. PROELL (From the correspondent in St. Nazianz, 14 Aug.) Mrs. J.P. Schreihart of Manitowoc and Mrs. Strack of Milwaukee, along with their children, visited their sister, Mrs. Proell here. 16 Aug. 1906, Der Nord Westen


PAUL PROWL Two Men Near Death As Car Is Turned Over CAR LEAVES ROAD ON 141, IS OVERTURNED Ed. Reindl and Paul Prowl Have Miraculous Escape From Death Two Manitowoc men, thrown out of an overturned car on Highway 141, about one half mile south of the junction of highways 31 and 141 at about 8 o'clock last night are under care of physicians today following a most miraculous escape from death or far more serious injuries than they received. Thumb Torn Off. Paul Prowl, 2610 Meadow Lane, passenger in the machine which overturned had the thumb of his right hand torn off and two other fingers are so severely lacerated that it may be necessary to amputate in order to save the hand. His back is also injured and he has severe bruises but it is believed that he escaped internal injuries. He is still confined to the hospital. Ed. Reindl, 936 North Fifteenth street meat market proprietor, driver and owner of the car, is expected to be able to retain his left ear following its being sewed in place after it was nearly severed from his head. When he arrived at the office of his attending physician, the ear was hanging by little more than a shred. A deep gash in his left cheek exposed the bone of the left jaw and he was otherwise seriously bruised. Suffer Blood Loss. Both men were in extremely weakened condition because of excessive loss of blood but this is expected to have no serious results. Both are resting easily today, Reindl at his home where he was taken this morning. Accident Theory. One of the theories of the accident is that Prowl seated next to Reindl, grabbed the steering wheel in the belief that Reindl was in danger of going into the ditch when a passing car or truck crowded them on the side of the road. The machine, a late model Willys-Knight touring car was steered across the highway to the left side of the road, went into a five foot ditch and skimmed along that for a distance before it struck a fence post and it overturned. The machine was badly damaged. The two men were reported to have been at Sheboygan and were on their way to Manitowoc at the time of the mishap. Prowl employed on the night shift of the cement plant, was to have been at work at 11 o'clock last night and it was for that purpose that the men were returning. Herbert Zannacker, one of the first to reach the scene of the accident, found Prowl a considerable distance from the car in a field, almost overcome by exhaustion, the man, in his maddening pain having started to run from the scene. Mr. Zannacker drove to a nearby telephone and summoned Dr. F.W. Hammond to care for Prowl while Reindl was brought to the city by another car. Manitowoc Herald News | Saturday, September 01, 1928 | Page 3


CAPT. PRUSS Capt. Pruss celebrated his 49th birthday yesterday. 28 May 1891, Der Nord Westen


WM. PUFHAL In County court. W.M. Lipke has been discharged as administrator in the estate of Wm. Pufhal, having performed all the duties in connection with the case. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Manitowoc, Wis. Saturday, January 21, 1899 P. 1


ROBERT PULS Charles Kulnik of this city, who was one of prize winners at the state skat tourney, has received a check for $15, which is thirtieth prize in the list. Robert Puls, also of this city, pulled down a $5 bill as his share of the prize money. Feb. 17, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MRS. A.J. PUSTABO (sic-[BUSTABO]) Mrs. A.J. Pustabo has returned to her home at Chicago after spending a few weeks with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Kaderabek. She was accompanied by her infant daughter. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, April 19, 1916 P.3


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MRS. A. QUISTORF (From the correspondent in Mishicott, 04 Sep.) Mrs. H. Timm of Manitowoc, with her daughter, spent a day here last week with her mother Mrs. A. Quistorf. 06 Sep. 1906, Der Nord Westen


F. QUISTORF (From the correspondent in Mishicott, 15 Oct.) Mr. J. Mackie of Milwaukee, who was married there a few weeks ago with Miss L. Quistorf, with his young wife has left here following a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. Quistorf. 17 Oct. 1907, Der Nord Westen